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I am working in a software company where we are mostly working on websites which are based on open source like dotnetnuke or nopcommerce or any other

and i am totally bored with all this as there is no scope for doing something new as most of the code is already done in these open source

i know the open source are good for company as they save their time and earn more money

but working on open source project is bad from a programmer view ?

i learn some good things from these open source also...like entity framework from nopcommerce 1.9

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are those open source projects perfect? –  oenone Oct 13 '11 at 9:02
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closed as not a real question by Mark Trapp Nov 10 '11 at 21:00

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3 Answers

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Being bored for a prolonged period is a good sign that it is time to move on, but I do not think that this has anything to do with working on an open source project or not.

The phrase "there is nothing new in the world..." applies to software as easily as it does to movies or books. Open or closed source, finding something new to do is a relative question. What I mean by this is: if I am writing a website for a clothing company using dotCMS, am I doing something new?

No: dotCMS (an open source CMS) is not new. No: plenty of clothing companies have websites. No: I am probably not going to implement new features in dotCMS as part of the project.

But more importantly: YES: it is a new project for me and I will hopefully learn a thing or two. or NO: this is the fifteenth dotCMS project in a row and I am bored.

I think the above answers will be exactly the same whether you are talking about using open or closed source software.

In every job I have taken, I have been doing new things on previously established frameworks, APIs etc. They were open source, but that isn't the point. What I was doing was new to me.. so if you are bored, look around for something that is new. :)

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'Bad' is subjective, and depends on the situation. If your job consists of primarily working with and extending open source systems, you are missing out on developing the skills and experience required for building 'whole' systems from scratch. (or mostly scratch, as few people work without some framework/libraries/etc). Thats not necessarily bad - its only bad if those are skills and experience you need/want. Similarly, people who focus on creating systems from scratch and never work with open source projects arent improving their skills related to working with those. Its a trade off.

If you are bored with what you are currently doing, next time around you'll probably want to look for a position that lets you be more creative.

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I think the situation is not symmetrical. If you are working on existing projects, you are learning how successful projects look like which will help you create something from scratch, but when you are always building from scratch and moving on, you are not learning how to understand and maintain existing systems. –  Jan Hudec Oct 13 '11 at 12:44
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Why not take your boredom and your experience with the open source applications that you work with and make a new and exciting addition for one of those projects and share it with the community? That way you'll be doing something new and helping that open source community at the same time.

I know for a fact that nopcommerce users are always looking for some functionality that is not built in to the standard application.

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