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I am writing a wiki article and wondering what is the proper way to write a directory scheme?

I am doing something like

main folder
- sub folder
- sub folder
...

But I'm stuck after that.

Any help?

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closed as off topic by David Thornley, FrustratedWithFormsDesigner, Anna Lear Nov 15 '11 at 13:43

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Where are you stuck? This looks OK to me. What's the problem? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Nov 8 '11 at 22:33
    
So what is the problem? –  Emmad Kareem Nov 8 '11 at 22:33
    
I have folders under that? Do I just keep adding -'s? –  Steven Nov 8 '11 at 22:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
root
  - sub1
    - sub1a
    - sub1b
  - sub2
  - sub3

keep the indention consistent ( I used 2 spaces ) and use a <pre/> or <code/> block in your html

you can try and make it look more like a tree control with a | if you want to stick to ASCII characters

root
  |- sub1
    |- sub1a
    |- sub1b
  |- sub2
  |- sub3

our use Unicode Characters from the Character Map Software provided by your Operating System

root
  ├ sub1
    ├ sub1a
    └ sub1b
  ├ sub2
  └ sub3
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I find the output of the tree command very readable. Here's an example that uses Jarrod's directory structure:

root
├── sub1
│   ├── sub1a
│   └── sub1b
├── sub2
└── sub3
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