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In Compilers: Principles, Techniques, & Tools, Aho et al describe an approach for optimizing for parallelism (chapter 11 in the second edition). Is anyone aware of any existing compilers which follow that approach?

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Maybe everyone and her aunt knows the book, but still how bout providing some quote(s) to establish some context? –  Martin Ba Jan 19 '12 at 14:23
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jaffachief please ignore @Martin. Real programmers know the Dragon Book by heart. –  Yannis Rizos Jan 19 '12 at 15:45
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@Zaphod, I am afraid some scamster may have fooled you into believing he would be a Real Programmer. Everyone knows that Real Programmers scorn on pathetic compiled programs and prefer hex editing the machine code directly instead. (Obligatory XKCD reference) –  Péter Török Jan 19 '12 at 16:15
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@ZaphodBeeblebrox, this is the Dragon book known by heart by real programmer. And AFAIR (sadly, I'm not ARealProgrammer, just AProgrammer :-), there is no suggestion of an approach for optimizing for parallelism in it. –  AProgrammer Jan 19 '12 at 17:29
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Different compilers will implement some of the Chapter 11 optimizations. Many compilers implement optimizations not discussed in Chapter 11. Is there a specific optimization you are most interested in? –  ahoffer Jan 29 '12 at 16:36

2 Answers 2

I don't have any first-hand experience with it, nor do I know whether the techniques used are in the Dragon Book to the letter, but the Sun Studio C and C++ compilers can do automatic parallellization of for loops.

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I can't answer directly that question, regarding parallelism or concurrency, but, the Dragon Book was written some decades ago, with some updates, maybe, and Compiler Techniques have change a lot.

I have read some compilers docs, on the internet, and some of them use different ideas.

Besides, there are other books & (online) publications about compilers, that try to "kill the dragon", each one in a different way.

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