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We have a situation in our team in which one member prefers his own ideas no matter what problems it has.

When confronted with issues about a specific design he made - this teammate can get very protective and does not see the problems.

In a result, this is a serious Software design issue for our team, because in the end some of the teammate's design will fall through to the end-design, and it will damage our software.

Should we confront the teammate about his overall behaviour?

Should we go the boss and tell him we can't deal with it and it's hurting our design?

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closed as off topic by Yannis Rizos, thorsten müller, GrandmasterB, gnat, Mark Trapp Feb 2 '12 at 9:00

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As I really dread getting down-voted I look intently to the reasons questions get down-voted. right now I don't get it, so I would like the user who down-voted me to explain the reasons, so I could learn for future questions. –  Mithir Feb 2 '12 at 6:16
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Voted to close, this is a rant, not a question. You've already made up your mind, what are you asking? And even if there is a question in there, you should be asking your manager, not random people on the internet. –  Yannis Rizos Feb 2 '12 at 6:32
    
@YannisRizos Can I rephrase it to be more of a questions than a rant? there are a lot of questions here like " dealing with cut-and paste programming" which are built exactly the same. –  Mithir Feb 2 '12 at 6:35
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Please post an example of the competing designs in question. Then everyone can decide for themselves who is the botcher. Having majority doesn't make you right automatically. –  ThomasX Feb 2 '12 at 8:33
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@Mithir - Notice that only the accepted answer made the slightest reference to programming, and that was the word 'design'. Once in a while that happens for a question that's borderline on topic, but it's not a good sign. I would suggest asking about the design issue in question instead. People here could answer that better and, who knows, maybe your teammate is right? If not, maybe you will get a good argument about why out of it. –  psr Feb 2 '12 at 17:28
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3 Answers 3

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Should we confront the teammate about his overall behaviour?

Yes, you should. After all, you're having an overall problem with him. Few, if any of the single design decisions present an actual problem at the great scale of things, and as long as they are all you talk about with your teammate, you cannot expect his approach to change. For that to happen, you must discuss his approach with him.

Should we go the boss and tell him we can't deal with it and it's hurting our design?

Only as a matter of last resort. If you really can't solve this alone, pressure from above won't make it any better. So if you can't work as a team, it is best to isolate him (i.e. put him on one-man-projects). But before you go down that road, try to find a solution with him. In the end, you all want to be happy - him included. Working towards mutual appreciation is a good way to achieve it.

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Talk to your boss, someone who has authority over him, and make this his responsibility. These kinds of people not only hurt the product, but also hurt productivity and morale. You could request your boss not to mention your name.

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Been there - no really, I did :). Someone should confront him, someone with the authority, but not your boss I think. It has to be someone with technical knowledge, someone that can REALLY stand-up to him, if no such person is present, then your boss should. I call these "cold showers" - they are really helpful imho.

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