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Concurrent programming in Python is very colorful (and confusing too). There's just too many options with each having it's pros and cons...

  • Thread based (threading module)
  • Process based ( multiprocessing module)
  • Co-routines (greenlet, gevent, eventlet)
  • Async (Twisted, Tornado)
  • Inter-process communication (subprocess module)
  • Message queue based (ØMQ, PyCom, mpi4py)
  • Others (Pyro, execnet, Parallel Python)

I know some of these and can write programs using them. But, I just don't feel I know them pretty well -- I can't decide what to use when. I don't know how to put these into perspective.

So, my simple question is -- what are some open source projects that employ these techniques so that I can see them in action in real program.

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closed as not a real question by vartec, gnat, Mark Trapp Feb 13 '12 at 22:59

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
This is kind of question with no single correct answer, which doesn't fit the way StackExchange works. –  vartec Feb 13 '12 at 10:26
    
Why can't there be correct answers? All I am asking is some open source projects that use concurrent programming in Python. That's it. –  good_computer Feb 13 '12 at 11:47
5  
A good question has to have one answer, that can be chosen as the most correct. You're asking for a list. –  vartec Feb 13 '12 at 11:57
1  
Please make your question more specific or ask one question on each area (or group of areas). –  ChrisF Feb 13 '12 at 21:31

1 Answer 1

There is no real way to say which one is good which one is bad and which one to start with. This depends greatly on what you intend to do with this knowledge later and your current level of expertise.

Having said that I would probably start with Twisted, and Zope.

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