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I have a two job offers currently one from a upcoming funded start up (I) and other from one of a large established software giant (A)

I is paying me less than A but I has potential to pay me better as they are really well funded .

What should I do

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closed as off topic by GrandmasterB, thorsten müller, Jim G., Tom Squires, Marjan Venema Mar 5 '12 at 9:14

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Join the job which you think would suit you the best of your skills. If you can tone up your skills, you can always move from A to I or I to A. Picking I is risky but the risk is worth taking. –  Ubermensch Mar 5 '12 at 6:19
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4 Answers

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It all depends on what point in life and in your career you are at.

If you are young or don't have a family you need to think of, you should definitely go for the startup.

The established company will still be there, in case your startup affair does not work out.

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Pick a company you believe in. It is hard to be passionate about your job if you are not passionate about their aims or their product.

Start ups and small companies may not suit your way of working and if you want a secure job they may not be the best place to go. Big companies do have their benefits, they often have good training programs with large budgets that can help you develop and get certification which will definitely help in later life, in my experience small companies will not do this unless it is going to benefit their immediate business needs.

Go online, find out how the company works. Do the staff work late? Do they go out partying? etc etc. Once you find out things like this you can easily make a decision wether or not you will fit in.

Good luck with the hunt!

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I once had a professor at university who asked us students what kind of company we would try to get into once we had finished our studies. A few of us mentioned the names of very large companies. Our professor then said to us that we should start with smaller companies or even start our own. Once we were 50 we could still join the large companies to prepare for retirement...

That's what the professor said. Partially I agree with this. If you are looking for a role in which you can make a difference without being limited by a gazillion policies, processes and rules then maybe a smaller company might be the better choice. But then there are also large companies which have departments that function very much like a start-up.

Ask questions to find out about the culture in the particular team. Then try to assess whether this is the kind of team you are looking for. Forget about the size of the company. A large company does not offer more job security than small ones, see Kodak, Nokia, etc. I would recommend to find out whether you are a good fit for the team and whether the team is a good fit for you.

Good luck!

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If you go for a small enterprise you get to learn a lot. There is a greater chance of being noticed and if you are strong performer, you will get faster promotions and pay raises. You will have more responsibilities and you might be asked to manage multiple projects.

Large companies provide more security and higher pay.

For a boost in your career choose I or if it's for the long haul choose A.

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