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As a Java programmer I need to learn algorithms (for programming Challenges). I read some Head First Series (JAVA owned by me) and they are pretty brain friendly. So I was wondering is there any algorithm book that will be simple to understand and also goes to the crux of each algo.

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closed as not constructive by ChrisF May 7 '12 at 18:55

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Not a book, but a great and potentially easy-to-understand resource similar to Head First: class.coursera.org/algo . Registration is closed, but they will probably repeat the class. –  B Seven Mar 26 '12 at 12:19
    
It's always difficult to find similar question and I end up putting a duplicate question. Please vote up for any book before this question is closed by someone. Thanks –  Abhishek Simon Mar 26 '12 at 12:53
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possible duplicate of Is there a canonical reference on algorithm design? –  S.Robins Apr 26 '12 at 3:02
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3 Answers

Personally I learned with Algorithm Design Manual by Steven S.Skiena, and currently use Algorithms In a Nutshell to as a quick reference for algorithms I don't implement to much. Algorithms In a Nutshell uses both Java, Ruby, C, and C++ for its code examples but being a Java coder you shouldn't have too much trouble reading the C/C++ code snippets. And even if you couldn't read them, they aren't essential for understanding the algorithm, a full description is available purely based on text and pictures.

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I read here that it's not good for beginners. Now I am in dilemma. Please help –  Abhishek Simon Mar 26 '12 at 13:00
    
Huh, I disagree, and the people on SO seem to agree with me, see stackoverflow.com/questions/5689222/… –  jozefg Mar 27 '12 at 1:16
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I personally like the book Algorithms by Robert Sedgewick and Kevin Wayne very much. The book has very beautiful illustrations show how different algorithms work, and also provides very practical examples. You can get some feeling about the quality of the book by visit the companion website.

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I found this

to be very helpful during my second year at the university.

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