Take the 2-minute tour ×
Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using jQuery, jQueryUi and qTip in my web application alongside custom JavaScript I've written. All three of the JavaScript libraries I mentioned above are licensed under the MIT license. From what I've read, I just need to include a copy of the MIT license for each of those libraries in my web application.

Is it OK to put each license as a separate file underneath a "licenses" directory of my project? So, I would have a licenses directory with "jQuery-MIT-LICENSE.txt", "jQueryUi-MIT-LICENSE.txt" and "qTip-MIT-LICENSE.txt" in it. Or, do I need to put the licenses right at the top of the JavaScript files? Confused about where exactly these licenses need to be put in my web application...

What I'm ultimately looking to do is combine all of the JavaScript files into one minified version for faster loading and I want to put the licenses in whatever is the proper place...

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

JQuery puts this in their minified version, so I would say you would need to include something similar for each library you are including into the file for each library.

/*! jQuery v1.7.1 jquery.com | jquery.org/license */

share|improve this answer
    
OK - if that's all that's needed, then that's great. jQueryUi and qTip also do the same thing. Do you think it's ok to combine all three plus my custom JS into one file as long as those headers are present? –  Zack Macomber May 2 '12 at 12:11
    
I don't see an issue with that. –  Ryathal May 2 '12 at 12:12
    
I was thinking the same thing but wanted to make sure I didn't violate licenses. Thanks. –  Zack Macomber May 2 '12 at 12:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.