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Time to time, I have to work on a website that involves a huge background in size and resolution (1920 x 1080 in resolution, over 2mb in size). I've been using preloaders and it worked very well, except that users have to wait a little bit.

I noticed that google map splits a big image into many pieces. I researched about it and found out that it actually increases perceived performance.

Is this true?

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Consider trying it, and compare afterwards. –  user1249 May 7 '12 at 19:26
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen // got your point, but please give me at least a single byte answer. Otherwise, you're just trolling here. I'm not here to get a wisdom saying. I'm here to discuss and find answers –  Moon May 7 '12 at 19:49
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I do not "troll". The only way you can find out if it works for you is to try. Users might find it disturbing, they may not. Depends on what the background is there for. I remember the very first Mosaic browser which did not show a web page until ALL images were fetched fully. This was one of the reasons the Netscape browser spread like wildfire. –  user1249 May 7 '12 at 20:06
    
Also, you should know that the moment you accept an answer, there will be very few new answers. If you - as you said - are here to discuss, you may want to wait a bit longer before accepting the next time. –  user1249 May 7 '12 at 20:08
    
@ThorbjørnRavnAndersen // I will wait a little bit longer next time. If you could put your second comment earlier, that would have been nice. Your comment is a valid point..thank you. –  Moon May 7 '12 at 20:24
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closed as not a real question by Jarrod Roberson, gnat, Mark Booth, ChrisF May 12 '12 at 11:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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up vote 6 down vote accepted

This definitely improves user perceptions.

Any time your users can see something churning on the page, they will be more inclined to wait for everything to load versus not showing them any progress and making them guess when everything will be done.

I think you are much better off loading pieces as they come available.

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