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Is there a requirements/issue tracker software which is similar to Google spreadsheet?

We have Fogbugz but I find it more heavyweight and slow than a simple spreadsheet.

Is there a Fogbugz alternative which is - fast - can show issues/requirements as a spreadsheet (at) and allows in-place editing - supports tree structures (where issue can have child issues)?

It is required for a small project. There will be 2 developers and 1-2 other users. I guess that only one user will be actively maintaining it.

UPDATE

I do not say that a spreadsheet is better than Fogbugz or similar tools. In fact I am looking for a tool which is similar to Fogbugz and could replace a spreadsheet, but faster than Fogbugz and has an additional feature (table-like mode). I'd like to find a tool which can operate in a mode which looks like a table (one row per issue) but has a rich set features (similar to Fogbugs and JIRA).

I find Fogbugz (and similar tools) inconvenient because I must enter the web form in order to edit anything. In-place editing (when issues are shown as a table) would be much faster.

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if you think a spreadsheet is better you are doomed to begin with –  Jarrod Roberson May 25 '12 at 18:13
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I think this is totally wrong-headed. If you want to use a spreadsheet, so use it. I don't see anything that a spreadsheet can do better and more lightweight than an issue tracker like Fogbugz, JIRA, Trac or any other. –  mliebelt May 25 '12 at 20:35
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Why not just use a Google Docs spreadsheet? Make it accessible to the team (or just readable by some). You are definitely wrong-headed if you think Fogbugz is heavyweight! –  Peter K. May 25 '12 at 21:19
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@SnOrfus - I do not want to sacrifice features. In fact, I am looking for more features (table-like mode). –  Maxim Eliseev May 28 '12 at 9:10
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@PeterK. Sorry, but you probably misunderstood me. Please see the update above –  Maxim Eliseev May 28 '12 at 9:11
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Atlassian Jira is an alternative. Jira supports plugins and there are is a plugin called Structure that supports hierarchy.

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True, but if the OP thinks FogBugz is "heavyweight", I've not known Jira to be any lighter. Good mention of the Structure plugin though. –  jcmeloni May 26 '12 at 14:43
    
Thanks for that. Does Jira has a table-like mode (where user can edit cells directly)? –  Maxim Eliseev May 28 '12 at 9:15
    
@MaximEliseev Vanila Jira can display lists of issues and allow them to be edited individually or en mass, you need Structure to have the 'edit field in the table' feature (never used Structure so can't comment on how good this is) –  jk. May 28 '12 at 9:44
    
It seems Structure is what I would need. I will look into it. Structure demo: demo.structure.almworks.com/secure/… –  Maxim Eliseev May 29 '12 at 12:16
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With time, I tend to replace heavyweight bug tracking tools by simple online spreadsheet (I like Google Spreadsheet). But this is only viable with small and controlled projects with few resources.

In a complex project with 6 or 7 developers under multiple stakeholders, testers or managers, I don't see any serious software development shop developing today without a proper bug tracking tool.

If you want simplicity & if you really think FogBugz is too heavy for you particular case, the minimum viable solution I found is Trello, which I used for that with success if a couple of big projects I worked on.

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+1, for interesting software link. –  Emmad Kareem May 28 '12 at 12:29
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