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Recently I got a job offer from csc as consultant application development. Currently I am working as a software engineer.

Can somebody enlighten me on what is consultant application development career growth , job type, security and what is there role ?

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Short Answer: It is another way of saying non full-time employee (non-W2 wage employee in US)

There are benefits and pitfalls in this type of contracts that an individual developer should be aware of. Thus, it pre-assume that you are hired for the contract with hourly pay without any benefits (healthcare, sick days, holidays, 401K, vacation).

Although offered hourly pay is much higher than standard full-time employee (W2), it has no benefits like healthcare coverage, which is important for a family with kids.

Thus, if you are single, pretty healthy and don't need your company benefits then switching to be consultant (1099 in US) will bring more cash to your pocket.

Another positive benefit is that you should constantly better manage your work, combined with self-motivation to learn and deliver results in the shortest time frame. In another words, if you have character to be better while constantly competing this might be your arena of glory.

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Don't forget the self-employment tax. You are dinged 15% for FICA rather than 7.5%. (See taxguide.completetax.com/text/Q15_3110.asp.) Also, the term of the contract is important. Short term gigs need higher rates as there will be gaps between them unless you are very lucky. –  Steven Burnap Sep 29 '12 at 23:26
    
This is also a good point to mention. –  Yusubov Sep 30 '12 at 0:06
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