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I am planning to build a mobile application (a text editor based app) to primarily use with my symbian device. I have plans to make it commercial too, once its complete.

Now the manufacturer (NOKIA) website lists some choices for mobile app development - java, native platform for symbian (using c) and QT.

I am aware about the aspects of scaling and extending the app for other platforms. Android is increasing in it's market share like anything, symbian is losing too. Also if i need to get the platform specific functionalities (say reading the contact list or sending an sms) i should be compromising the portability. I was not able to find any comparisons between these portability and platform specific features aspects.

If i chose java, i think i could easily port my application for android/iphone and make it commercial. I have no idea how portable the QT platform can be. I do not want to go by Nokia's suggestions since i doubt they are biased to their products(even if they provide excellent developer support)

I have to start learning from the beginning, irrespective of whichever platform i chose (except languages) Please advice me if i have assumed something wrong, and your opinion about portability versus platform features.

Thanks,
Abhi

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closed as off-topic by gnat, GlenH7, MichaelT, Kilian Foth, user61852 Aug 10 at 1:03

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3 Answers 3

You can learn C/C++ Programming languages, so your logic is clear. Then after that you can read Java Programming language. There are lots of android application development using Java code.

As a mobile application developer, you need to think about all mobile application languages, so you can easily create any apps. Androids need Java language, iPhone need C/C++ language concepts.

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Thank you for making your first post on Stack Exchange Programmers. Welcome. –  DeveloperDon Oct 9 '12 at 8:42

If you are writing it for yourself first and you already have a Nokia Symbian device - go with what you have and know. Too many times we get caught up with what "could have been" and never get anything developed. Build your app to your needs and once you have what you want, then worry about marketing/selling it. A good app is a good app and if you find it useful, chances are other people will to.

Also, iPhone development has a steep upfront cost - you will have to own a Mac and you can build a Windows PC for 1/2 as much for Nokia/Android/Java dev.

If you want the most cross-platform capability - go with Java ME platform. http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javame/overview/index.html

There is more devices support JavaME than any other. I also like Karianna's link - cross platform tools may be the future of mobile dev... but I still think the vendors want to maintain control like Apple does with iPhone and Google does with Android.

Regardless, build your app for what you want and then worry about porting/saleing, etc.

Good luck, Mike

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Given the uncertainty around several languages/platforms in the mobile space right now you probably want to look at something like:

http://mashable.com/2010/08/11/cross-platform-mobile-development-tools/

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great link , i never knew stuff like this existed. but are these frameworks really working, ie already past their testing/incubation period and proven to be working well? –  dbza Nov 6 '10 at 13:58

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