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Suppose I'm developing a (javascript) library which is hosted on a public repo (e.g. github). My aim in terms of how version numbers are assigned and incremented is to follow the guidelines of semantic versioning.

Now, there's a number of files in my project which compose the actual lib and a number of files that 'support it', the latter being docs, a test suite, etc. My perspective this far has been that version numbers should only apply to the actual lib - not the project as a whole - since the lib alone is 'the unit' that defines the public API.

However I'm not satisfied with this approach as, for example, a fix in the test suite constitutes an 'improvement' in my project, which will not be reflected in the version number (or the docs which contain a reference to it). On a more practical level, various tools, such as package managers, may (understandably) not play along with this strategy. For example, when trying to publish a change which is not reflected in the version number, npm publish fails with the suggestion "Bump the 'version' field set the --force flag, or npm unpublish".

Am I doing it wrong?

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1 Answer 1

My perspective this far has been that version numbers should only apply to the actual lib - not the project as a whole - since the lib alone is 'the unit' that defines the public API.

But to the World your final Product is something more: A combination of

  • Code (the lib per se)
  • Doc
  • Test-sute

If you change anything in this triad you get new version of product which can't (logically) share the old one's ID.

If you prefer to strictly follow SV-rules and use only 3-octets, you can

  • Use p.7 for all non-library changes

Patch version Z (x.y.Z | x > 0) MUST be incremented if only backwards compatible bug fixes are introduced

docs|tests changes may be considered as bug-fixes and they are backwards compatible. Thus, from version 1.1.0, docs changesets may increment it towards 1.1.9999, but not 1.2.0

  • Operate with p.11 for non-core code changes

A build version MAY be denoted by appending a plus sign and a series of dot separated identifiers immediately following the patch version or pre-release version.

and from 1.1.0, the version will be incremented towards 1.1.0+9999.

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