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“Why just think your tests are good when you can know for sure? Sometimes Jester tells me my tests are airtight, but sometimes the changes it finds come as a bolt out of the blue. Highly recommended.” - Kent Beck

But I see that there is not even a tag called "Jester" in stackoverflow. So what is the modern replacement for Jester,if any ? How can one be sure that unit tests written are rock solid other than finding statistics from code coverage from tools like Cobertura and Clover?

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I removed my clarifying comment because you edited the question. :) A Google search with that phrase will yield you 3 or 4 examples off the bat, so maybe focus on the conceptual question you have at the end, so you can get some ideas for how best to try out & select the tool that fits your needs? –  jcmeloni Mar 9 '13 at 16:42
    
@jcmeloni is there any reason why jester didn't really pick up? –  Geek Mar 9 '13 at 16:44
    
I have no idea; I never used it. –  jcmeloni Mar 9 '13 at 16:48
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up vote 12 down vote accepted

As far as I'm aware mutation testing remains the best automated process for measuring the quality of your test suite. There are two good modern replacements for jester

http://pitest.org (I'm the author)

https://github.com/david-schuler/javalanche/

A detailed comparison between them, jester, and a couple of other systems is available here

http://pitest.org/java_mutation_testing_systems/

I think the main reason that jester never took off was that it was unworkably slow and scaled very badly.

PIT and javalanche both attempt to address this in a similar way. Instead of blindly running all the tests in a project against a mutation they first gather line coverage and run only those tests that can actually hit a mutation.

PIT also performs various other optimisations to speed things up and offers an option to re-use the results of previous analysis to greatly reduce the computational cost of subsequent runs.

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The PIT eclipse plugin is not getting installed in Indigo, there seems to be some error in that. –  Narendra Pathai Oct 15 '13 at 12:34
    
@NarendraPathai Try reporting the issue via the pit google group. Phil Glover, who maintains the plugin, might be able to help. –  henry Oct 15 '13 at 16:20
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