Take the 2-minute tour ×
Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was recently asked this from my friend after explaining how µTorrent worked, he then went to ask me, "Could this be used for browsing the web?", (not a direct quote) but I found my self thinking about this for a while there after.

  • Could someone be credited with making the first Peer-2-Peer browser?
  • How could it send the correct data without it being modified?
  • Would it be faster than normal browsers? (Referring to the way µTorrent works, I find when I use a torrent it's faster than a web download.)
  • Can it save on server loads, prevent DDoS, more?
share|improve this question

closed as too broad by gnat, GlenH7, MichaelT, Bart van Ingen Schenau, jwenting Aug 13 at 9:50

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you talking about something like Tor (wiki)? Not a browser per se, but you can use it with one. –  tjameson Mar 27 '13 at 8:16
    
torents are usually huge. Web Pages are usually small. Web pages contain interactive code while torrents don't. You still have a single point of failure the server that tracks where are the torrent sub modules are so on a peer to peer browser network you still need a source server to tell you were the actual page can be found. So no protection from DDos. –  Loki Astari Mar 27 '13 at 12:48
    
@tjameson, That was actually very close, it's most likely the closest thing to what I was saying. –  user85613 Apr 11 '13 at 23:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Could someone be credited with making the first Peer-2-Peer browser?

A browser already operates using peer-to-peer communication. While writing this post my computer is speaking directly with the computer at programmers.stackexchange.com. There's no central machine in the middle that is handling my connection and the connection to the server here.

How could it send the correct data without it being modified?

You ask the peer for data and it sends that data. It is up to the peer to determine what to give you when you ask. There's nobody else to get in the way and modify everything.

Would it be faster than normal browsers? (Referring to the way µTorrent works, I find when I use a torrent it's faster than a web download.)

Torrents are not inherently faster than any other internet communication. All machines connected to the internet have a maximum speed that they can send data at depending on multiple factors (actual internet connection speed, congestion, etc...). As such if you are trying to download a file from a server that has a very poor connection it will go slowly. If you attempt to download the same file from uTorrent and find many peers available for it there will be more bandwidth and thus it will go faster.

Try downloading a file from a provider that you know has plenty of speed available and you will see how fast HTTP can be: http://cachefly.cachefly.net/100mb.test

Can it save on server loads, prevent DDoS, more?

Not really. There's still a computer sending data and thus said computer can be overloaded with too many requests like any other.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, as @tjameson said I was thinking a bit out of the box, I think my friend is a little crazy and so am I. I wasn't sure if that could happen, but Tor seems pretty close. –  user85613 Apr 11 '13 at 23:19