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I know there are some products for reverse debugging.

I am wondering that does reverse debugging mean going to one step back or starting over again up to one step back?

I've found an explanation here.

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marked as duplicate by gnat, MichaelT, Yannis Rizos Apr 16 '13 at 17:45

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I can't tell you if it means "really debugging backwards" because I don't know what you mean by "really debugging backwards" ;-) –  delnan Apr 16 '13 at 16:49
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@delnan: He means "does it reverse the previous step or does it run from the beginning with a virtual breakpoint on the previous line." –  pdr Apr 16 '13 at 16:54
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@pdr Thanks. I couldn't explain it clearly. –  blank Apr 16 '13 at 16:55
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Reverse debugging is putting the bugs back in. –  Anthony Pegram Apr 16 '13 at 16:59
    
Are you thinking of the omniscient debugger? –  MichaelT Apr 16 '13 at 17:00
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

does reverse debugging mean going to one step back or starting over again up to one step back?

According to the link you posted, "reverse debugging" means being able to undo instructions in the debugger. So you'd have something like a 'step back' command that tells the debugger to reverse the effect of the last instruction executed. It doesn't mean re-running the program to get back to the previous instruction.

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