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I am new to Clojure. I can understand the code I write but it becomes too difficult to understand it later.
It becomes difficult to match parentheses.

What's the generic conventions to follow regarding naming conventions and indentation in various situations?

For example I wrote a sample de-structuring example to understand but it looks completely unreadable the second time.

(defn f [{x :x y :y z :z [a b c] :coll}] (print x " " y  " " z " " a " " b " " c)) 

In case of de-structuring, is it better to do it directly at the parameter level or start a let form and then continue there?

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There is a good answer about readability at Stack Overflow. You can check it out. stackoverflow.com/a/1894891/1969106 –  blank May 7 '13 at 7:19
1  
Writing readable Lisp code is difficult in general. They invented the backronym "Lost In Superfluous Parenthesis" for a reason. –  Mason Wheeler May 21 '13 at 18:26
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1 Answer

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Naming conventions

  • stay lowercase for functions
  • use - for hyphenation (what would be underscore or camel case in other languages).

    (defn add-one [i] (inc i))

  • Predicates (i.e. functions returning true or false) end with ? Examples: odd? even? nil? empty?

  • State changing procedures end in !. You remember set! right? or swap!

  • Choose short variable name lengths depending on their reach. That means if you have a really small auxiliary variable you can often just use a one-letter name. (map (fn [[k v]] (inc v)) {:test 4 :blub 5}) choose longer variable names as needed, especially if they are used for lots of code lines and you cannot immediately guess their purpose. (my opinion).

    I feel that a lot of clojure programmers tend to rather use generic and short names. But this is of course not really an objective observation. The point is that a lot of clojure functions are actually quite generic.

Lambda functions

  • You can actually name lambda functions. This is convenient for debugging and profiling (my experience here is with ClojureScript).

    (fn square-em [[k v]] {k (* v v)})

  • Use inline lambda functions #() as convenient

Whitespace

  • There should not be parens-only lines. I.e. close the parentheses right away. Remember parens are there for editor and compiler, indentation is for you.

  • Function parameter lists go on a new line

   (defn cons
     [a b]
     (list a b))

This makes sense if you think about the doc strings. They are between the function name and parameters. The following doc string is probably not the wisest ;)

   (defn cons
     "Pairing up things"
     [a b]
     (list a b))
  • Paired data can be separated by a new line as long as you retain the pairing
  (defn f 
    [{x :x 
      y :y 
      z :z  
      [a b c] :coll}] 
    (print x " " y  " " z " " a " " b " " c)) 

(You can also enter , as you like but this feels unclojurish).

  • For indentation use a sufficiently good editor. Years ago this was emacs for lisp editing, vim is also great today. Typical clojure IDEs should also provide this functionality. Just do not use a random text editor.

    In vim in command mode you can use the = command to properly indent.

  • If command get too long (nested, etc.) you can insert a newline after the first argument. Now the following code is pretty senseless but it illustrates how you can group and indent expressions:

(+ (if-let [age (:personal-age coll)]
     (if (> age 18)
       age
       0))
   (count (range (- 3 b)
                 (reduce + 
                         (range b 10)))))

Good indentation means that you do not have to count brackets. The brackets are for the computer (to interpret the source code and to indent it). Indentation is for your easy understanding.

Higher order functions vs. for and doseq forms

Coming from a Scheme background I was rather proud to have understood map and lambda functions, etc. So quite often, I would write something like this

(map (fn [[k x]] (+ x (k data))) {:a 10 :b 20 :c 30})

This is quite hard to read. The for form is way nicer:

(for [[k x] {:a 10 :b 20 :c30}]
  (+ x (k data)))

`map has a lot of uses and is really nice if you are using named functions. I.e.

(map inc [12 30 10]

(map count [[10 20 23] [1 2 3 4 5] (range 5)])

Use Threading macros

Use the threading macros -> and ->> as well as doto when applicable.

The point is that threading macros make the source code appear more linear than function composition. The following piece of code is pretty unreadable without the threading macro:

   (f (g (h 3) 10) [10 3 2 3])

compare with

   (-> 
     (h 3)
     (g 10)
     (f [10 3 2 3]))

By using the threading macro, one can typically avoid introducing temporary variables that are only used once.

Other Things

  • Use docstrings
  • keep functions short
  • read other clojure code
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That function with de-structuring looks beautiful with indentation! –  Amogh Talpallikar May 8 '13 at 5:28
    
+1 for keep functions short. Lots of little functions are much more self documenting –  jozefg Jul 4 '13 at 5:39
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