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I would like to know how transparency is defined, and what is the measurement for this in the context of a broker architecture.

For example :

from a developer point of view, [in the broker architecture] distribution is transparent. you talk to a broker one way or the other and it introduces an object model in which distribute services are encapsulated within objects.

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closed as not a real question by Jim G., GlenH7, MichaelT, Dynamic, gnat May 11 '13 at 0:49

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What reference can you provide that demonstrates transparency within architecture is a good thing? While property X in domain Q may be good, there isn't an automatic transitive property that property X will remain good in domain P. –  GlenH7 May 10 '13 at 20:11
    
I don't think I was looking for a qualitative assessment of why it's good. Rather what it is in context of the architecture given. –  peter_gent May 11 '13 at 13:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Good software in general is composed of decoupled layers. The application layer understands the object model. The messaging layer is decoupled from the object model. Changes in the object model does not affect the message broker.

  2. Another aspect is the composition of different components in the application layer into a distributed system. Fault tolerant architecture one component is decoupled from failure in another component. Without a broker when component A sends a message to component B a failure of B would directly affect A. The broker can store messages and forward them when B recovers. This is done transparently for A.

  3. Routing between components also is a source of coupling. In SOA each service has an entry point (reverse proxy) that masks the server fron the client. In messaging architecture the broker could route messages without the component A even knowing that component B would be handling the message.

Notice how in all these cases the architecture takes responsibilities from the components making each component more coheseve and decoupled from each other.

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Good answer. I'd like to add to point 2 that the distribution promotes transparency because the components require a defined contract for their communication. –  Andreas Huppert May 10 '13 at 19:45

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