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I have years of Java coding experience, but no apps or code samples of my own.

1)Will an Android/iOS app help me get into Enterprise Java work, or because the fields are so different will it be irrelevant?

2)If (1) is irrelevant, what else can I do to avoid becoming a front end(HTML/CSS) web developer/designer.

Thank you

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closed as off-topic by Bryan Oakley, gnat, Bart van Ingen Schenau, Blrfl, James McLeod Aug 2 '13 at 18:12

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking career or education advice are off topic on Programmers. They are only meaningful to the asker and do not generate lasting value for the broader programming community. Furthermore, in most cases, any answer is going to be a subjective opinion that may not take into account all the nuances of a (your) particular circumstance." – gnat, Bart van Ingen Schenau, Blrfl, James McLeod
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1  
career advice is off topic on this site. –  Bryan Oakley Aug 2 '13 at 17:18
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I have years of Java experience but no apps or code samples of my own I find this unusual... Not even any projects done for your classes? Showing that you can write code is a +1 for most employers so getting started with some hobby projects of any sort would help –  jozefg Aug 2 '13 at 17:19
    
thanks jozefg, in specifically breaking into enterprise coding, would android apps be helpful? should i try and develop some type of enterprise based technologies website even if it isnt necessary for the website itself, thanks –  user98522 Aug 2 '13 at 17:26
    
"Will an Android/iOS app help me get into Enterprise Java work, or..." -- Questions seeking career or education advice are off topic on Programmers. They are only meaningful to the asker and do not generate lasting value for the broader programming community. Furthermore, in most cases, any answer is going to be a subjective opinion that may not take into account all the nuances of a (your) particular circumstance. –  gnat Aug 2 '13 at 17:30
    
Java is one of the most highly demanded skills in the marketplace right now. This would hint more at a problem on your part than anyone else's part. The degree isn't, by itself, going to do much for you. If you can get HTML/CSS work, take it now, write Java demos, and seek work from a position of income security rather from desperation. –  Meredith Poor Aug 2 '13 at 19:15

2 Answers 2

Your college/university SHOULD have a Placement Office, that works with potential employers to arrange interview schedules for seniors and new grads.

They're your best bet.

I have NEVER heard of an employer wanting to see major code samples for an entry-level hire. By definition, an entry-level hire has little to no work experience. The best you can hope for is a few summers of co-op experience, and some internships. Also, depending on where you co-op'ed or interned, the code may not be releasable.

In a healthy economy, a new BS from a good school should have no trouble with Placement Office interviews. (In an unhealthy economy, you're screwed, and so is everyone else.)

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As I just graduated from college 2 months ago I will throw out my two cents but take it as you will.

In my search I had 6 offers from various companies. I will list things that I think had an influence on my job offers.

  • I knew what I wanted to focus on (NoSQL and data storage)
  • I had relevant experience with what I wanted to focus on (https://github.com/harageth/PolyglotPersistenceDemo which was used as a demo app for a guest lecture I gave to my schools Advanced Database class)
  • I was able to give swift accurate answers (and in my focus area where they were not necessarily knowledgeable on, I had the relevant experience to show I knew what I knew)
  • I was involved with my local startup community which in turn showed a work ethic (through a startup weekend we built and deployed a website in 18 hours)
  • I am flexible and easy to work with (This may be an overly conceited comment but I really do try to be flexible and make everyones job as easy as possible)
  • President of my schools chapter of the ACM (shows leadership ability and an ability to work with others)
  • I networked a lot. Seriously be social and get to know people.
  • I had 3 internships on my resume. One of which I designed a relational database system and built a website with minimal guidance and alone.

All in all I highly doubt that building any sort of application would hurt you. I would highly recommend building something with J2EE, even if you don't finish it before an interview at least you will be able to discuss what you are working on currently, the technology that they are using (assuming you are interviewing for a position that uses J2EE), and your methodology for solving that particular problem.

But then it does all comes down to your interviewer in the end... My answer is subjective as commented by gnat and the interviewer himself is going to be subjective as well.

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