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I am a software developer, and have knowledge of oo design, e.g. SOLID, and looking for a good book on object-oriented modeling.

Is the book below still good to read?

Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models Martin Fowler Publication Date: October 19, 1996

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closed as off-topic by gnat, Martijn Pieters, MainMa, MichaelT, Bart van Ingen Schenau Aug 3 '13 at 11:55

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"Is there other book ..." -- Questions asking us to recommend a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Programmers as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it. –  gnat Aug 3 '13 at 9:17
    
Thanks for the advice. I updated the question. –  Pingpong Aug 3 '13 at 9:40
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Absolutely still relevant.

The analysis patterns that Fowler talks about deal with frequently occurring tasks in administering organisations. These business practices and tasks don't change as much, as quickly or as often as for example development practices do. And even there the frequent development tasks as addressed by the Object Oriented Analysis Patterns from the Gang of Four, just as relevant today as when they were written.

Patterns are abstractions discussing how to solve a problem. They don't care about what is used to implement them. As such they don't age as the technology used to implement them ages.

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