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i just basically realized that it's almost impossible to truly learn and master each programming language/technology before a new version is released.

so my initial thought was to focus on the .net platform, but then what about the business domain side of the thing?

does it make more sense to pursue more knowledge about the platform including taking MCPD, etc or does it makes more sense in the long run to focus on the business domain, i.e. web commerce and only things that is related?

i'm just a starting up as programmer and would like to know what's a good way to direct myself to growth so that i could master a certain area for career growth.

any tips or article would be nice ;)

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closed as off-topic by MichaelT, Kilian Foth, GlenH7, Robert Harvey, Jimmy Hoffa Jul 22 '13 at 16:10

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Just focusing on the .NET platform? There's troubles there too! :) programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/19149/… –  Steve Evers Dec 1 '10 at 5:01
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4 Answers

What's worked for me has been: Do what you love and the money will follow.

I like math, complicated problems, writing C and C++ on Linux and Macs, and banging out code I think is cool or runs really fast or does interesting things. That's led to a career doing graphics and human interface work, and open-source development, mostly working from home, and comfortably well-paid. Much of what I do is bleeding-edge, so while I'm not a master, nobody else is either, so I get to play one on TV. :-)

But I have friends who have been very happy developing domain expertise and sticking with one employer for decades.

So it really all depends on what makes you happy. Go for that, and you'll do great work and be in demand.

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(from stackoverflow)

I guess the answers is: it depends.

Depending on what Industry you work for it might require a different level of domain knowledge for example Finanial and Medical jobs may require more business knowldge than someone who develops for Education.

So if you happy with the industry you work in I would say spend 50/50 of your free time futhering you skills. However if you think the job your in is only a stepping stone to bigger and better jobs focus more on the tecnical skills.

Another point to consider is what do your want for career path to be. A technical line such as developer, technical lead, architect. Or a Manager, project manager etc.

So the first three questions you need to ask youself are:

1) do I like the industry I am in and am I still likely to be in a similar sector 5 years from now

2) Where do I want my carerr to go? Techical or Bussiness

3) Do I like the technology I am using at my employment? Am I stuck doing .NET when I would rather be using Ruby?

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That is an excellent advice, one I wish had someone told when I was young. –  Gaurav Dec 1 '10 at 4:45
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Start off by being a generalist. When you know enough (a little bit of everything), you can move to being a specialist.

Specializing at the beginning of your career magnifies your weak points and doesn't make you flexible.

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i'm just a starting up as programmer and would like to know what's a good way to direct myself to growth so that i could master a certain area for career growth.

I think it is too soon to be making judgements and decisions like this.

Yes, it is true that is virtually impossible to entirely master a given technology. But the flip side that you don't need to do that to be effective. Experience will give you a guide as to how much (or little) you need to know ... and how/when to call on the skills of others.

does it make more sense to pursue more knowledge about the platform including taking MCPD, etc or does it makes more sense in the long run to focus on the business domain

Again, wait until you've more experience and figured out which aspects you like doing more. Bear in mind that the "business domain" side of things changes all the time too.

Finally, if you are wanting a career path that avoids you having to learn new skills all of the time, IT is probably the wrong field for you. IT is always changing.

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+1: "Finally, if you are wanting a career path that avoids you having to learn new skills all of the time, IT is probably the wrong field for you. IT is always changing." So true. –  Bob Murphy Dec 1 '10 at 4:46
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