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I'm looking for a tool to do system wide dependency analysis in C# code and SQL Server databases. It's looking like the only tool available that does this might be CAST (CAST software), which is expensive and it does lots more besides that I don't really need.

C# code through to database column dependency would be hugely useful for many reasons, including: - determining effects of database changes throughout the system - seeing hot spots in the database schema - finding dead stored procedures, tables, etc. - understanding the existing code base

Do such tools exist?

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closed as off-topic by gnat, MichaelT, GlenH7, Kilian Foth, Dan Pichelman Sep 18 '13 at 14:32

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This is really difficult when dynamic SQL is generated. –  k rey Jan 19 '11 at 18:14
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2 Answers

Yes, I think NDepend will do this for you. http://www.ndepend.com/ .... It used to be free, I see it is no longer. And it probably wont do the DB. Oh well..

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Maybe you can hack it yourself with the database's system information tables, and e.g. ReSharper's PSI-module for analyzing C# code; given that you call SProcs and SQL in a fairly common manner, you could then join the call sites with the sproc's meta-data to see what would affect what.

(; In general though, it seems to be a good idea to start moving away from sprocs as much as possible. I remember there was a heated debate won by the code-not-sprocs crowd in 2006. ;)

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