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Hey guys , Im trying to look for a good Java programming book , if any of you know a good one please let me know and if you know the price that would be even better :) thanks .

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See also Best Java book you have read so far on SO. –  Péter Török Jan 26 '11 at 21:42
    
Hard copy book price depends.... –  Kugathasan Abimaran Jan 27 '11 at 5:19
    
I found Thinking In Java to have a more serious tone than the previously mentioned Head First Java, which some people may prefer. –  bobmcn Apr 26 '11 at 17:41
    
You may want to indicate whether you are new to Java, or new to Object-Oriented programming, or new to programming altogether. This could help others to recommend (and upvote) appropriate books. –  Eric Wilson Apr 26 '11 at 17:46
    
Eckel is more serious, but he is also extremely verbose. I read most of this book, an have mixed feelings about it. –  Eric Wilson Apr 26 '11 at 17:48
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8 Answers

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Head First Java

It's probable that I'm not the typical person to come to this book, which I finished recently (actually the Safari online version). I've been programming - sometimes professionally - for decades. I had a Java class at night many years back, but hadn't really used it until I got a relatively new job in which I've been challenged by trying to simultaneously (really) learn Java and object-oriented programming for the first time as well as a 400K+ LOC code base, some other new tools, and a new "domain" of work. I'd seen several recommendations for this book, including using it to learn object-oriented programming as well as Java.

As noted in comments and other answers, the book (like all the Head First books I understand) is unconventional. The point is to make the book more enjoyable and make the knowledge "stick" better. I'm not yet sure if it made the knowledge stick better, but for a while it was more enjoyable than a lot of programming books I've read. Having said that, I do have to admit that the kitschy style eventually wore thin for me. Nonetheless, I stick by the recommendation, as it covers and explains the language well.

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+1 This book is awesome because it steps you through the language in an easy and fun way while covering questions like why rather than just what. I would hit Head First Design Patterns right after this book. It will help further your understanding of the some of the design decisions made in the Java API. –  Carlosfocker Jan 26 '11 at 20:16
    
thanks carlos ill take your advice –  walid Jan 26 '11 at 21:30
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I hate Head First books including this one. They make you feel like a 4 year old. This book is not bad if you are okay with scrolling through all the stupid stuff. –  zhenka Jan 26 '11 at 22:20
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@Eugene For a novice programmer, they may be just the thing, though. We all learn differently. –  Anna Lear Jan 27 '11 at 5:14
    
Is this a good book for someone new to Java but already knows other programming languages? –  JD Isaacks Apr 26 '11 at 15:02
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Just for starters, have you seen the Java Tutorial yet? It's online (not in actual book form) but "Trails covering the basics" is a great place to start learning Java.

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hey jony,yes i tried that but it wasn't really helpful –  walid Jan 26 '11 at 21:30
    
@Walid, why not? –  user1249 Apr 26 '11 at 17:54
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Head First Java is good when you have no experience in other language like C/C++ OR you have not done any good project(even a small one) in any language, what i like most about Head First Java is "It considers you an idiot and not only it teaches Syntax of the language but also it shapes your creativity with cross words, small apps etc.
But if you are a good developer directly go through Sun/Oracle's Trail its excellent.
Good Luck

!

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You should upvote the existing answers that mention the same book and tutorial instead of adding your own. –  Anna Lear Jan 27 '11 at 5:15
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@ Anna : I did say Head First but also i explained why and in what case you should go for it or the Sun's tutorial. –  Ranger Jan 27 '11 at 5:35
    
please add links in your answers allowing for easy access to the various resources. –  user1249 Apr 26 '11 at 17:55
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Oh, that's easy...Head First Java

They start of from the basics with an understanding that you are not an expert programmer. They have lots of modularized examples and teach you in multiple visual styles (VERY useful since people learn differently one of these styles will appeal to your brain). They have a sense of humor in each chapter so the material is fun to learn and not dull like i've found MANY other books. I'm reading this now in tandem with taking an online java course. And I'm telling you this book is worth the money. I just wish the online course was using this book as it's basis.

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Hello and welcome to Programmers.SE. As you can see, Head First Java was already mentioned a few times in other answers. Please don't add duplicate answers without additional content (such as some details on WHY Head First Java is the best book, for example). The usual approach is to upvote existing answers if you don't have anything new to add. If you provide good answers to a couple questions, you'll gain enough rep to upvote others' answers in no time. –  Anna Lear Feb 9 '11 at 22:00
    
@Anna. I've expounded on my post hope this helps. –  thefonso Feb 9 '11 at 22:32
    
That works. Thanks! –  Anna Lear Feb 9 '11 at 23:04
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M currently using Thinking in Java, this book is easy to understand but i recommend you also get other books that are more practical-oriented, Java How to Program can suffice...

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I am a java programmer and I taught myself the same way. The way I learned was by going through 2 different books. The first was Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies, this book was great, and without it, I wouldn't have been able to understand the fundamentals of java, every other book seemed to complicated at the time (and / or long and tedius / boring). Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies on the other hand makes things appear simple, while keeping humor in it, so you don't get too board. The only thing is that it only teaches the fundamentals. The second book I read was Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours. This book was amazing. It might as well have been a "sequel" to Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies, it takes what you know from that, and expands it so that you can understand much more of the java syntax (like the whole idea of GUIs, it is only slightly touched on in Beginning Programming with Java For Dummies, but it goes into detail with Sams Teach Yourself Java in 24 Hours.) To get into more detailed things, the best way is just to use the knowledge you learned from them, and just give yourself a programming project to do. for the little details, search google.

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I started with Core Java, the book is very useful, it focuses on the things you need to get started with Java, as well as some interesting topics people usually like to know when they first begin to learn Java, like GUI development with swing.

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Java How to Program from Deitel, not as good as Head First Java for learning purposes, but is used in many programming introductory courses, at least in my country. Also could be a good reference book later in your path.

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