Take the 2-minute tour ×
Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Since I have a long train ride to and from work I was wondering if there is a version of the Java API documentation floating around that I could put on my Kindle. It would be nice on the rare occasion I get something in my head that I want to think about some more.

I know I can browse the web through the Kindle but coverage is spotty and slow. I know that the API docs are not really designed for a sequential reading format but I'm curious to see if anyone else has thought about this and given it a shot.

Note I am not reading the Java API to learn how to program Java but to review classes I plan to use. The differences between things like FileReader and FileInputStream are subtle and best gained from reviewing the API and not reading a chapter in a book that will tell me a lot of stuff I already know.

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by gnat, GlenH7, MichaelT, Joris Timmermans, Jimmy Hoffa May 6 '13 at 14:34

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Why not read a proper book, like Effective Java, instead? –  Péter Török Feb 10 '11 at 16:06
    
I am not reading the Java API to learn how to program Java but to review classes I plan to use. The differences between things like FileReader and FileInputStream are subtle and best gained from reviewing the API and not reading a chapter in a book that will tell me a lot of stuff I already know. –  AmaDaden Feb 10 '11 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've got Java in a Nutshell from O'Reilly for precisely that purpose.

Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition... adds more discussion on tools and frameworks. It also offers new code examples to illustrate the working of APIs, and, of course, extensive coverage of Java 5.0. But faithful readers take comfort: it still hasn't lost any of its core elements that made it such a classic to begin with.

This handy reference gets right to the heart of the program with an accelerated introduction to the Java programming language and its key APIs -- ideal for developers wishing to start writing code right away. And, as was the case in previous editions, Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition is once again chock-full of poignant tips, techniques, examples, and practical advice...

share|improve this answer
    
I totally forgot about that books existence. I guess this is the best solution since it's more then just the plain dry API. It's just a shame that the latest version of the book is for Java 5. Hopefully with Java 7 around the corner the book will be updated soon. Thanks! –  AmaDaden Feb 11 '11 at 14:02

Reading API documentation to become a better developer makes as much sense to me as reading the Merck manual (essentially an encyclopedia of diseases) to become a better doctor. Without context and purpose, they will tax your memory but not give you any useful skills.

Reading books on development in general (with an actual narrative and organization) or getting up to date on trade journals and articles and blogs (which you can download) seems like a better use of your time to me.

share|improve this answer
    
The reason I am looking to do this is precisely why I agree with you on reading other things to become a better coder. I have no plan to memorize the API so I would like a copy of it on my reader so I can look at while I think about my code. I don't plan to read the API cover to cover. –  AmaDaden Feb 10 '11 at 20:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.