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Should you be an OOP expert if you're developing in ASP.NET?

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Wouldnt this depend on 1) what you are actually doing in ASP.NET and 2) what 'OOP expert' means? –  GrandmasterB Feb 21 '11 at 20:49
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You should know OOP if you are coding anything beyond static pages. –  Tyanna Feb 21 '11 at 22:25
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Well, it certainly can't hurt to know OOP when using a platform based on an object-oriented language. –  Anna Lear Feb 23 '11 at 5:47
    
Define expert... –  Dynamic May 12 '12 at 20:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Expert is very strong, but ASP.NET is part of the .NET platform and used with VB and C#. So I would say that you need to know OOP and how to use it. I can't see how you would be effective with ASP.NET without that knowledge.

Things like providers, factories and other design paterns are widely used throughout ASP.NET. But also the WebControls are constructed with OOP principles.

Check the following questions on stackoverflow for material:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1972432/books-of-oop-programming-for-non-oop-programmers

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3315633/which-is-the-best-book-to-learn-and-implement-design-patterns-using-c

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/4295892/learning-oop-in-c-best-books

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Do you recommend any good OO books that could contribute toward my OO learning? –  TeaDrinkingGeek Feb 21 '11 at 18:36
    

It never hurts to know OO. In addition asp.net sucks, go learn asp.net mvc or just quit now ;-) said with all the humor possible.

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Really? Do you seriously need to leave that type of comment? Humorous or not, it's not appropriate for this site. –  unforgiven3 Feb 22 '11 at 19:14
    
@unforgiven, it was supposed to be humorous? –  Marcie Feb 22 '11 at 21:42
    
I don't think that type of "humor" is appropriate for this site. –  unforgiven3 Mar 7 '11 at 15:41
    
Humor is always appropriate, but you're entitled to your opinion. –  Paul Roe Mar 11 '11 at 14:57

Yes.

How can you be a developer today and not be an OOP expert?

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To be honest how many true OOP Experts have you actually met in your lifetime. If it's more than a handful then either you've worked with some really talented people or you are too liberal with your usage of the word expert. –  Paul Roe Feb 21 '11 at 19:31
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I meet them all the time. I guess by "expert" I mean "a guy who truly understands what he's talking about with regard to OOP". It's not that complicated, and if you claim to be a developer and aren't an expert in OOP, then I think your claim is wrong -- just like a developer should be an expert at boolean logic or and expert at flow control in code. –  Nick Hodges Feb 24 '11 at 3:18
    
Actually you can. Knowing what inheritance is and calling methods is not equal to being OOP expert. –  Boris Yankov Jun 9 '11 at 17:53

You don't have to be expert. You just need to know C#.NET/VB.NET basics which will include some OOP essential knowledge.

Moreover check some MS ASP.NET How to videos - most of them are far from real architecture, layering or OOP principles. I especially "like" those which place button in designer double click on button and write all logic and DB access to button click handler.

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Quote: "I especially "like" those which place button in designer double click on button and write all logic and DB access to button click handler." <- that's the way I use to code asp.net 1.1. –  TeaDrinkingGeek Feb 21 '11 at 20:46
    
@TeaDrinkingGeek: Me too but that was exactly the way how I learned what is wrong and hard to maintain and I started to learn OOP principles. –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 21 '11 at 21:09

Expert
1: obsolete : experienced
2: having, involving, or displaying special skill or knowledge derived from training or experience

Yes; the language makes a lot of use with object oriented methodologies. Knowing some OOA/D from experience/training will certainly help you in ASP.NET.

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