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I'm hoping to give a talk at RubyKaigi this year, and I'd like to know what makes a good talk proposal.

RubyKaigi is a conference run by Ruby enthusiasts (as opposed to it being a trade conference, or an academic conference). The proposal form can be seen here.

So far, my draft proposal about a program I'm working on mentions:

  1. What the program is useful for and why it is relevant.
  2. How it works.
  3. What topics it touches upon (such as metaprogramming and testing)

Is there anything that I should mention in my proposal?

Also, how thorough should I be in my "Details of your talk" section? Should I be exhaustive, or only have a couple of short paragraphs?

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@Lenny222: What a FOSS conference would want would be different from, say, what a scientific conference would want. –  Andrew Grimm Feb 28 '11 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your proposal should be a few paragraphs on what you want to talk about and why people should find it interesting. If they have questions they will get back to you. Don't stress too much, just find an interesting topic and give it a good description.

Proof read it first of course.

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You should write down for who and why the topic is interesting. I can guess from your README file that it would be interesting for different ruby implementers (jRuby, Rubinius), but you may want to mention the target audience explicitly. Also, if you already find interesting finding from your experience, you may want to mention them briefly (not all) as a teaser.

Hope this advice helps and good luck!!

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