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I am looking for a conference or training which will give me a broad exposure to enterprise level software architecture. I've been with the same company for 10 years and we've grown to the size where we really need to lay out a framework for the applications which support our company's business. The organic growth over the last 10 years has left us with a tightly coupled and fairly messy set of applications. We need to do a better job at componentizing our business entities and have more rigorous control on the interfaces between those entities and our business processes. I'm looking to get a broad, yet practical exposure on design patterns to support that architecture (SOA, messaging, ESB's etc). I'm hoping to gain insight from folks who have direct experience with implementing or working with what would be considered an enterprise class architecture.

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Enterprise architecture and enterprise software architecture are not the same thing, by a longshot. –  Robert S. Aug 5 '11 at 14:11
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closed as primarily opinion-based by gnat, GlenH7, MichaelT, Kilian Foth, Dan Pichelman Jul 16 '13 at 13:28

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2 Answers

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IASA has a comprehensive architecture training syllabus.

programs are based on the following core resources:

  • The Certification Path - The Iasa Certification/Career Path serves as the primary source for understanding how an architect advances through their career. By establishing a technical ladder for architects, an organization resolves to lay the foundation for more successful IT maintenance and projects.
  • The IT Architect Body of Knowledge (ITABoK) - The ITABoK features a matrix of five essential skills that have been found to support successful architecture initiatives across all architect roles in an enterprise. The ITABoK has been shaped by thousands of practicing architects from a variety of industries, geographies and specializations.
  • The Skills Taxonomy - The Iasa Skills Taxonomy is the cornerstone of Iasa's training curriculum and certification structure. It provides a mapping of the five foundational skills described in the ITABoK to four prominant architect communities that work together to support an enterprise architecture.
  • The Iasa Engagement Model - Iasa's engagement model describes all ways that architects touch a business or customer and determines the success or failure of an architecture team. Engagment is all about contribution to shareholder value. Iasa can work with your organization to develop custom training to address the specific needs of your team...

You might find it useful.

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+1. I have attended IASA training class and it was quite high quality and very useful. –  RationalGeek May 17 '11 at 21:04
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Even though EIP is a bit outdated, I would start with that. Enterprise Integration Patterns is still relevant. Depending on the platform you are using, I would also try to get to some of the conferences and try to track down people using the patterns you are interested in. For example, you'll often see sessions at conferences on some sort of messaging pattern, if it an ESB, CQRS, Actors, or just plain messaging.

Your profile says you are in the DC area, so I would consider hitting up Codemash, DevLink, and maybe one of the QCons, SF or London.

If you talk a bit more about your platform it might be easier to point you in a more narrow direction.

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