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Well, I have a certain dispute with a colleague of mine.

We have a software design where we build all of our widgets server side and send them client side as html.

Most of the time it's better and easier to control and add stuff to. But sometimes it just is not that good; it makes the client side act "retarded" regarding the situation at hand. Another major flaw is that it gets really slow for unapparent reasons.

So what would you do in this case?

Edit:

When I say "retarded" I mean the client side is not aware of any changes made by the server side, it just gets a string of functions it supposed to call to if something goes wrong with loading one of the resources that is passed from the server side(f.e. an image or another script) the client side is limited when in need to handle the errors.

This situations are handled very poorly since the client side does not have a "clear view" of the state at hand.

Of course you can handle the situation from the server side(in a twisted way), but then again why bother so much when it is so much more simplified when dividing the rolls.

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Could you clarify ...makes the client side be "retarded" regarding the situation at hand...? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Mar 21 '11 at 15:35
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Agree with @Frustrated. What makes it "retaded"? You'll need to expand your question and provide more details. –  Walter Mar 21 '11 at 15:38
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner well I say "retarded" since the Client side just gets a bunch of html, css and javascript, it doesnt get a data structure in json of some sort and is not active in building the widget in client side. F.e. if you get an html with bunch of pictures that are not at your control(an api search of some sort), than what would you do in that case? leave the widget as it is? even though it will miss it's whole point? –  Cu7l4ss Mar 21 '11 at 17:54
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Document your findings in a brief, factual memo. No opinions on "retarded". Facts and only facts. Measurable evidence. Nothing else.

Send it to all concerned.

Then do nothing else. Nothing. You've done all you can do, which is provide facts.

When it becomes a large enough problem that someone who has budget authority (i.e., a manager) wants to spend money for you to redesign it, enjoy a brief round of "I told you so." Then redesign it.

Above all, stick to measurable facts.

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+1 for the measurable fact approach –  Gary Rowe Mar 21 '11 at 19:00
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