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My web application is currently written in JSP/Java, using an Oracle DB. I develop on Windows, and I use JDeveloper (Oracle's eclipse clone) and I use JDev's integrated WebLogic Server.

I want to go live using a respectable Web hosting company. LAMP devs get all the girls, I'm stuck using WWOJ (Windows Weblogic Oracle Java). I can't find any hosts that use Oracle, and ones that run Tomcat are few and far between (short of a custom box on RackSpace).

I'm switching to MySQL this week. I'm running Tomcat on my Windows box now, and using NetBeans. I can compile a .war now. I'm finally up to WTMJ :)

Does anyone have experience with getting a Java project hosted? Or something with an Oracle backend? I feel like I'm lost out here.

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Not as popular as Linux Apache MySQL Brainfuck. –  Job Apr 18 '11 at 15:53
    
I think your question is "Where can I host my Java Web application?", not "Is LAMJ (Linux Apache MySQL Java) popular?" –  vjones Apr 18 '11 at 18:08
    
@vjones you are wise, edited –  Brad Apr 18 '11 at 18:41
    
Oracle in production (which is what you intend) requires a license, i.e. real money. You probably want something cheaper for now! –  user1249 Apr 18 '11 at 19:38
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One option would be to get a Linux virtual server and install the software of your choice on it (that might even let you stick with Oracle products if that's your preference).

If that's a little too much setup and administration for you, you could look at using Bitnami's TomStack. (There are some Amazon EC2 Machine Images listed at the bottom - inlcuding one running Windows).

If you did want to stick with Oracle, you could also investigate the Oracle AMIs

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The best place I know of to host a Java Web application is on Google App Engine. It scales really well as it's free for low usage. Once you hit your quotas it's then pay as you go.

Most Java Web hosting can cost anywhere from $25 per month and up, but Google App Engine is free to start.

Our organization hosts many Web applications and Web sites on Google App Engine. For example, Conversion Support is hosted entirely on Google App Engine, and we don't pay a dime for hosting.

The database is also powered by Google. The only possible drawback is that you must either build your application to use the Google Datastore, or expose a RESTful Web Service so that your application can communicate back to your Oracle DB. However, the Google Datastore is fast. We've even seen evidence of the actual datastore being faster than Memcached!

If you've already built your application, you may have some serious refactoring to do to get it to run on Google App Engine, but it may be worth it considering all of the costs, both in time and money, of hosting your project elsewhere.

If you're looking for Java hosting that scales with you, go with Google App Engine for Java.

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This answer is the most underrated post on Programmers. It may only have 2 upvotes (well, 3 now), but also 12 anonymous users thought "this was helpful". –  Yannis Rizos Nov 8 '12 at 18:39
    
Be aware, though, that using Google Datastore means coding specifically for their APIs, making migration away from Google a pain. (This is true whenever you use hoster-specific solutions) –  adhominem Jul 17 '13 at 12:43
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