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I fairly understand that this Q+A site is programmers destination and questions on hosting are not permitted here, but anyone who has heard of Google's App. Engine is well aware that this question is suited for this site only.

Google App. Engine supports either Java or Python interpreter. I want to know what type of applications can be hosted on this engine? If my Python or RoR application needs a database behind, will this engine support it?

For RoR applications, which interpreter to choose? What are the advantages of Google App.Engine over a local IDE?

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You can check out OpenShift(yes! RedHat!) openshift.redhat.com/app or Heroku if you're bent on running RoR(they support Python/Django also). I use both appengine and OpenShift - in the latter, you can use MySQL also - and IT IS FREE!! –  yati sagade Nov 13 '11 at 19:20

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The google app engine currently only supports Java and Python code. That means you will have to use JRuby, which is a is a Java implementation of the Ruby programming language if you want to be able to run rails on the platform. This is an example of a JRuby on Rails app running on app engine - http://jruby-rack.appspot.com/. Heres another http://rails-primer.appspot.com/.

BTW Google App Engine is NOT an IDE far as I know...

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+1 for the last line –  yati sagade Nov 13 '11 at 19:18

If your Python application needs a database behind it, GAE has a Datastore and a Blobstore. Additionally, Google now has an experimental Cloud SQL service available in a Trusted Tester program.

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