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I've read:

And I've got 2 questions:

  1. Is Google App Engine considered PaaS or IaaS?

  2. Is HaaS a subset of IaaS or is HaaS really just another name for IaaS?

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1  
Not sure about 1. As for 2: it is, ideologically, a subset - that is to say that in an IaaS I don't think it's necessary that the infrastructure elements treat the hardware as a service per se (it could be proprietary OS/etc. dedicated for proprietary hardware). The differentiator is that the OS could belong in an IaaS but not in an HaaS. –  Steve Evers May 16 '11 at 1:18
    
@SnOrfus: Please post your answer as an answer so we can upvote it properly. –  S.Lott May 16 '11 at 2:13
    
@S.Lott: It's only half of an answer at best, so I thought it left best as a comment. Will promote it. –  Steve Evers May 16 '11 at 3:57
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@SnOrfus: Since it doesn't ask for specific clarifications, it doesn't look like a comment. Since it provides answers, it sure looks like an answer. –  S.Lott May 16 '11 at 12:24
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This answer is from an article that I read "Toward a Unified Ontology of Cloud Computing"

  1. As Google App Engine gives you a platform for better utilization of Google's resources, it can be considered PaaS. A good key for me is "Is this environment giving me some kind of API for better integration with a system? Then it's PaaS."

  2. I read more than one definition about this, but nowadays what sounds better to me, and what the article writer says, is that HaaS, like CaaS (communication as a service) is a subset of IaaS: they create the infrastructure needed to perform IaaS, but it can't be considered essentially service like IaaS.

Here is a figure that describes what I'm saying:
cloud layers

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what is an "env" ? –  Pacerier May 16 '11 at 2:58
    
By env, I suppose they mean environment. –  Mamta Dalal May 16 '11 at 3:51
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Not sure about 1.

As for 2:

It is, ideologically, a subset. That is to say that in an IaaS I don't think it's necessary that the infrastructure elements treat the hardware as a service per se - it could be a proprietary OS/etc. dedicated for proprietary hardware.

The differentiator is that the OS could belong in an IaaS but not in an HaaS.

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why do you call a Haas an Haas? –  Pacerier May 17 '11 at 6:28
    
@Pacerier: When I'm saying it, I'm pronouncing it as individual letters as I don't consider it a word. –  Steve Evers May 17 '11 at 13:35
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Google App Engine allows you to create our own application in Java, so it's a Platform As A Service. However, you only can use a restricted subset of Java, so it's actually closer to SaaS than to IaaS (which gives you a virtual machine and let you install whatever language stack or application you want).

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1  
Restrictions on what you can do don't really change the fact that it's PaaS. It's still a platform that you build your app on. –  mikera Jan 12 '12 at 5:03
    
In fact, a PaaS is likely to have a few restrictions. After all, the whole point is that you get a platform that is abstracted from the actual facilities of the hardware/OS/software installed. –  Muhammad Alkarouri Jun 25 '12 at 17:54
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