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I just came across this while searching on Google for HTML/CSS tutorials. Does anyone recommend this software for building websites? Or should I just stick to learning pencil and paper hand coding instead?

I just want to put my focus in the right area.

Heres the link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/beginner/bb964635.aspx

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3 Answers 3

If you're learning ASP.NET, it's a decent option. It's just a crippled version of Visual Studio geared towards web development using the Microsoft stack. If you don't want to pay for Visual Studio, the Express versions are the way to go.

I'd use the more recent Visual Web Developer Express 2010, though.

If you're not learning ASP.NET or are building static HTML/CSS sites, it's not a good option.

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As a side-note, if your learning ASP.NET skip webforms and head straight for MVC! –  Raynos Jun 8 '11 at 16:32
    
ASP.NET MVC is still fairly new it was only release in 09. If plan to be a web developer than you'll need to know ASP.NET Webforms. Also please note ASP.NET MVC is built on the exist stack.So many features of ASP.NET webforms still can be used. –  Nickz Jun 10 '11 at 0:06

If you just want to learn HTML/CSS then ditch the IDEs. Notepad should be enough. A fancier alternative would be something like Notepad++ (which does code highlighting). I find learning to design websites using IDEs teaches you bad habits, while learning by text editing yields a much better understanding.

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Notepad is not enough. Try Notepad++, PSPad, WebStorm or Sublime Text –  Raynos Jun 8 '11 at 16:31
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@Raynos. I did mention Notepad++, but I disagree that run of the mill Notepad won't be enough. I definitely learned HTML using Notepad. Many others have as well. Code highlighting in NP++ is very nice, but not necessary as long as you keep your code well organized. –  System Down Jun 8 '11 at 16:37
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Yea I used NP++ before. I do want a good understanding so Im sticking to hand coding. The two websites I use most for HTML/CSS coding and its standards are: htmldog.com/guides and w3schools.com. If you have any better suggestions please let me know. –  David Espejo Jun 8 '11 at 16:48
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@DavidEspejo w3schools is a horrible website. Learn from Mozilla. The sitepoint reference is first class. –  Raynos Jun 8 '11 at 17:07
    
Wow amazing sites Raynos ,much better than what I was currently using. Thanks! –  David Espejo Jun 8 '11 at 18:36

I don't understand why people say it's not a good option, I find it great, and very intuitive and easy to use. Of course if your only using it for HTML, CSS, JS it might be considered bloated, but I still use it for such and really enjoy using it (I develop in .net with is as well).

I'm sorry but notepad++ isn't any good when you start creating more developed directory structures, etc. Vs lays it all out nicely.

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