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I'm a professional .NET -C#- developer who's interested in doing development for Android. I'd like to know if it's really necessary for me to first read a book or two on Java (like Java For Programmers 2nd), or if I should just be able to pick up an Android book (like Pro Android 3) and be able to -mostly- work my way around it without much fuzz.

Note 1: Java is not 100% new to me. For testing purposes, I've previously done a few -very basic- console applications and web applications.

Note 2: I'm not trying to shift from .NET to Java / Android anytime soon. I just wat to develop applications for myself and this wonderful community. :)

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

The basic concepts of application design are noticably different when it comes to Android development. You have a new UI, Task and OS interaction library, plus a set of 3rd party Java libraries, which means in depth Java knowledge of desktop and server platform isn't all that useful - the design patterns and constraints are different and the VM behaves slightly differently as well.

The only thing Android SDK has in common with basic Java library are basic datastructures and types, which aren't all that different from C# ones.

So as a C# developer you need to check up on one of C# vs. Java comparison lists, to see which language constructs Java does not support and you'll be on pretty much the same ground as any other Java developer making a fresh jump into Android development.

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Awesome. Sure hope you're right. :) –  rebelliard Jul 2 '11 at 15:11
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You don't need much 'advanced' Java knowledge. Basic is fine. The rest, you learn on the job. That is what I did.

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