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I'm a software developer that just switched teams so I shall write code in Java now. Last time I wrote something in the language was in programming 101 at uni (I was already an amateur coder back then).

So what is the best book/tutorial to get up to speed with Java? Where's the Java - the good parts? Learn you some Java for great good? Learn Java the hard way?

Or is it too enterprisey for that kind of passion...?

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There is exactly a books with this name oreilly.com/catalog/9780596803742 –  Chiron Jul 3 '11 at 12:06
    
“Learn you some Java for great good” — I’ve never liked the look of Java, but I’d buy a book with that title. –  Paul D. Waite Jul 3 '11 at 17:15
    
@Kosta keep in mind that Java 7 is coming out at the end of the month, with a number of new language features too...just something to be aware of. Some of the new features borrow from C#, like the try-with-resource statements. You can check out what else is new at download.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/technotes/guides/language/…. –  Cupcake Jul 3 '11 at 18:08
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There's always Effective Java.

P.S. - There's actually a Java - The Good Parts, but that's not what you want now. It's more like a collection of essays.

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Note, Java is not a big language, but it has an enormous runtime and eco-system. Start with learning the core language and the core runtime libraries.

A good online resource is the Java Tutorial.

If you want a book, then Head First Java is nice.

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Much as I usually like Head First Java, for somebody who already knows how to program it’s an utter waste of time. In fact, even for beginners one of the core criticisms of Head First Java is that it takes a lot of time to work through it, where other books cover the same topics much faster. –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 3 '11 at 13:44
    
For a C# programmer I see your objection. For less Java-ish languages you still need the introduction to the concepts. –  user1249 Jul 3 '11 at 14:42
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There is a ton of advice out there about what makes good Java - you're right that it's not a language that a lot of people do for fun, but developers still care about doing things right.

The answer to your question depends on what sort of level you're coming in at. The Sierra-Bates SCJP book is quite a thorough introduction to the syntaxy issues.

You can decide if you want to do the exam or not, but regardless the book is a decent reference.

For more OO-stuff, Head First Design Patterns is good.

The must-read for idiomatic Java is Josh Bloch's Effective Java 2nd ed. Not an introductory book, but really good advice throughout.

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These resources are good, but perhaps a bit advanced for a beginner. –  user1249 Jul 3 '11 at 12:02
    
Seems like he's done some coding in other languages, but point taken. –  Fritz Meissner Jul 3 '11 at 12:05
    
Yes, I'm looking for the advanced stuff to get me up to speed. Very nice suggestions so far! Thanks a lot everybody :) –  Kosta Jul 3 '11 at 12:11
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While books will teach you the basics, if you want to practice there are some sites with problems you could always try to get up to speed.

CodingBat (online Java, easy problems) and Project Euler (difficult problems) have some programming problems for you to solve.

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Head first Java is really good. I am reading that at the moment and loving it. Also new to Java. A lot of programming books are so boring but the Head First series is great.

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