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Is it ever too old to learn how to become a programmer?

I'm 30 years old going back to school for a 2nd degree in Computer Science. I will be transferring to my local state university this fall and would like to know if my age will be a factor when applying for internships.

I have already read a few threads about age and careers:

While it is reassuring to know that people are getting entry-level programming jobs at 30+, what about internships? Should I even bother with bigger companies like Google, Microsoft, or Apple?

I know we have laws against age-discrimination but lets not pretend we live in a perfect world where everyone follows the rules.

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I managed to obtain an internship in the UK at the age of 33. I made sure I had excellent grades, and could speak enthusiastically and passionately about why I wanted to be a programmer. Seemed to work for me. –  Darren Young Nov 19 '11 at 18:30
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marked as duplicate by Mark Trapp Nov 19 '11 at 18:11

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Does age matter? In my opinion, it probably does. The GOOD thing is, you're on the right spectrum about it. If I was looking for an intern and saw a potential employee like you, I'd jump up and down. What do you have going for you? You're not some 22 year old college grad. Whereas that doesn't necessarily mean something bad 100% of the time, you've got the benefit of the doubt. You are obviously doing a career change to programming because you WANT to, and that's given.

I would much rather have a 30 year old around that wants to learn about programming, than an early 20 year old that is just going through the motions to get a paycheck every two weeks.

As for the heavy-hitter companies you ask about, I couldn't say for sure except...go for it! Worst they can do is say no.

Good luck! Programming is about passion and the love for it to accel, and it looks like you have the golden ticket.

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Thanks for the feedback. I can only hope that all the hiring managers have the same attitude as you. –  user786362 Jul 14 '11 at 23:35
    
I would like to think so, and if a professional thinks otherwise than they are probably doing YOU a favor by looking elsewhere. Maturity and perspective is only gained by time and years. –  user29981 Jul 14 '11 at 23:38
    
You know, I really do enjoy programming. I had to work while completing my lower-division requirements which left little time for anything else but I recently quit to devote more time to my new field. So far this summer I have dabbled in Android programming and read a book on HTML5 and I'm having a blast. –  user786362 Jul 14 '11 at 23:50
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Web and mobile development are arguably two of the best dev fields to get into these days. Fun stuff! –  user29981 Jul 15 '11 at 0:22
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I'm 33 and wrapping up my Junior year in Electrical Engineering. I've had the same questions and thoughts as the original poster for about a year now. Unfortunately, I do not have a degree already; I just decided, after being in the workforce for 10 years, that I'd like to get a higher education with real skills and eventually an actual career versus just a job.

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