Take the 2-minute tour ×
Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development. It's 100% free, no registration required.

what is a NPR syntax, from what i have gathered from internet, i have come to conclusion that NPR is a performance related database. Its based on NPR database

Given that what i have gathered is correct, how do i extract data from this Database, what language\Tools should i be using?

share|improve this question
4  
It is kind of like using butterflies to program, but instead you talk in a soft and consistent tone about world news or other cultural topics. –  unholysampler Jul 18 '11 at 12:18
    
Did you read the link? They specifically define (in depth) TSQL queries. What didn't you like about the language/tools in the link you provided? –  S.Lott Jul 18 '11 at 15:09
    
@Lott, i did go through the pdf entirely, what i was not sure is, if tomorrow i get this NPR file\database, how do i open it and what tool do i use to connect to and run queries on it.Please note that it is part of the client requirement and i do not have files in hand. i was just prepping. –  rsapru Jul 19 '11 at 5:48
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

.npr can be a number of things (among others a lotus-notes file and an audio-file). From your question i gather you are not really sure it really is the database-related file-format from IBM?

Have you tried reading its magic number (see here)? Just open it in wordpad (if you are on windows) and tell us the first 200 characters of the file so we can be sure of which it is.

I will then adapt this answer of course.

share|improve this answer
    
eznme, it's a part of requirement given by our client, which says we have to extract data using NPR syntax. and i am sure it will not be lotus notes or Audio related file. I do not have sample file with me yet. I will definitely update this post when i have one. –  rsapru Jul 18 '11 at 9:40
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.