Take the 2-minute tour ×
Programmers Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm an experienced software engineer and an advanced Linux user. I already know C and C++. I've developed C applications on Unix in the past and C++ (mostly on Windows).

I would like to start to learn how to program on embedded Linux systems. I'm particularly interested by the ARM plate-form and the Beagle Board. I would like to learn how to do low level programming in C/C++ (device drivers, interfacing with BeagleBoard peripherals, compiling customized kernels, etc).

Could you point me to the best (free or not too expensive) ressources on the Internet? The best beginner books to learn to program C/C++ on Linux for ARM?

share

migration rejected from stackoverflow.com Apr 28 at 8:56

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers. Votes, comments, and answers are locked due to the question being closed here, but it may be eligible for editing and reopening on the site where it originated.

closed as off-topic by MichaelT, gnat, GlenH7, jwenting, BЈовић Apr 28 at 8:56

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Programmers as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – MichaelT, gnat, GlenH7, BЈовић
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
Are you trying to learn C/C++, or are you trying to learn the embedded-specific features? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Aug 1 '11 at 15:00
1  
You don't need to learn low-level or anything like that at all to make software that runs on a beagle board or similar. They run a fully featured linux. ARM is particularly similar to x86 in endianess, integer size and all, so code is very compatible (or portable if you like) between them. –  hexa Aug 1 '11 at 15:03
    
I already know C and C++. I will edit my question to add this detail. Thanks. –  esavard Aug 1 '11 at 15:17

1 Answer 1

I have found the Embedded Linux Primer book quite indispensable in my experience. It has some very practical examples and is a little more up-to-date than the Linux Devices Drivers book (although still useful).

share

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.