7
votes
2answers
959 views

Could we build a functional computer?

As mush as FP has done, in the end, all our programs are structured. That is, it doesn't matter how pure or functional we make a them - they are always translated to assembly, so what actually runs ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Is Haskell/Clojure actually unsuited for dynamic systems such as particle simulation?

I've been told in previous questions that functional programming languages are unsuited for dynamic systems such as a physics engine, mainly because it's costly to mutate objects. How realistic is ...
13
votes
5answers
2k views

In what programming language did “let” first appear?

I was wondering about the origins of the "let" used in Lisp, Clojure, and Haskell. Does anyone know which language it appeared in first?
8
votes
9answers
2k views

OS choice for functional developing

I'm mainly a .NET developer so I normaly use Windows/VisualStudio (that means: I'm spoiled) but I'm enjoying Haskell and other (mostly functional) languagues in my spare time. Now for Haskell the ...
6
votes
2answers
226 views

Language that can statically ensure a map's fields are present

If data is simple and objects are complex, I'm curious if there are any existing statically typed languages that would be able to augment(?) a map type into a type with guaranteed fields. I realize ...
22
votes
3answers
1k views

Why do some functional languages need software transactional memory?

Functional languages, by definition, should not maintain state variables. Why, then, do Haskell, Clojure, and others provide software transactional memory (STM) implementations? Is there a conflict ...
9
votes
1answer
306 views

Software Transactional Memory - Composability Example

One of the major advantages of software transactional memory that always gets mentioned is composability and modularity. Different fragments can be combined to produce larger components. In ...