1
vote
1answer
183 views

Are there theoretical reasons why arrays in C take less RAM than Java?

My experience is that Java requires about twice as much RAM compared to C (comparing char arrays or other comparisons). I also read in a hardware book that Java takes about twice RAM than C. Is is ...
0
votes
3answers
126 views

How are negative signed values stored? [duplicate]

I was watching this video on the maximum and minimum values of signed integers. Take an example of a positive signed value - 0000 0001 The first bit denotes that the number is positive and the last ...
1
vote
1answer
134 views

How to implement an algorithm out-of-core?

I want to implement a parallel clustering algorithm "out-of-core" in CUDA. My CPU has 12GB of RAM and GPU has 4GB of it. What I want is that the entire dataset should be on the disk, and I can pick ...
5
votes
1answer
161 views

At ping, why do we have to do array copying instead of passing on the source array that the client sent to us?

So I have been googling about this OpenSSL heart-bleed thing and somehow sees that it is caused by the heartbeat extension which requires client to ping the server to show its aliveness and it all ...
3
votes
2answers
157 views

How to manage memory in C interface for C++ implementation considering c++11?

I have a library implemented in C++ which has a C interface. This C interface is, for all intents and purposes, the only way to use this library. C++11 seems to discourage the use of raw pointers but ...
2
votes
4answers
458 views

Why do we use to talk about addresses and memory of variable in C?

Why do we use to talk about addresses and memory of variable in C, where in other languages (like in Java, .Net etc) we do not talk about variable address and memory in a program, we will directly use ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Can anyone explain representation of float in memory?

This is not duplicate question as I read the previous question. Can anyone help me in understanding how float values are stored in the memory . My doubt is here float values contain '.' (for example ...
12
votes
1answer
602 views

How important it is to fix memory leaks?

I found by Valgring that some GTK+ programs leaks memory. How important it is to fix those leaks? I mean, often those programs works very well but on the other hand, one can never be sure if one wants ...
3
votes
2answers
749 views

How many `malloc` calls is too many? If any?

I'm implementing a system in C, implemented partially as a library. The library does most of the memory management itself, with the application layer just having to call *_destroy functions on the ...
-2
votes
4answers
841 views

C simple arrays and pointers question

So here's the confusion, let's say I declare an array of characters char name[3] = "Sam"; and then I declare another array but this time using pointers char * name = "Sam"; What's the ...
1
vote
6answers
3k views

Serializing Data Structures in C [closed]

I've recently read three separate books on algorithms and data structures, tcp/ip socket programming, and programming with memory. The book about memory briefly discussed the topic of serializing data ...
3
votes
4answers
653 views

strategies to keep tabs of memory leaks in non memory-managed languages

When it comes to non memory managed languages such as C, C++ or Fortran (my case), it becomes increasingly difficult to keep track of memory allocation/deallocation, especially when ownership must be ...
5
votes
6answers
1k views

Addressable memory unit

From Wikipedia: the term endian or endianness refers to the ordering of individually addressable sub-components within a longer data item as stored in external memory (or, sometimes, as ...
56
votes
11answers
795 views

Have you dealt with space hardening?

I am very eager to study best practices when it comes to space hardening. For instance, I've read (though I can't find the article any longer) that some core parts of the Mars rovers did not use ...