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2

If you must really go that way (sometimes it's a requirement imposed by the "up-aboves"). you could create long explicit String codes ie : ERROR__PROJECT_COULD_NOT_CREATE_THAT_UBER_IMPORTANT_RESOURCE and through a deterministic hashing function turn it into a 32 bit integer. Ideally to be global you should probably have some sort of centralized ...


1

If your software is a DLL, you MUST provide both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. You have no idea whether the customer will be using 32-bit or 64-bit software to talk to the DLL, and the DLL has to use the same bit-length as the application. This is non-negotiable. If your software is a standalone executable, it's less clear. If you don't need your software ...


6

The difference between 32 bit software and 64 bit software is the size of the pointers, and maybe the size of the integer registers. That's it. That means all pointers in your program are twice the size. And (at least on an ILP32/LP64 architecture) your longs are twice the size as well. This typically works out to about a 30% increase in object code size. ...


72

Benefits of 32-bit software in 64-bit environments Lower memory footprint, especially in pointer-heavy applications, 64-bit vs 32-bit can easily double the memory requirements. Object files are smaller as well. Compatibility with 32-bit environments. Memory leaks are hard capped to 2 GB, 3 GB, or 4 GB and won't swamp the entire system. ...


7

If the software needs to interface directly with legacy systems, drivers or libraries, then you may need to supply a 32-bit version, since AFAIK the OS generally (definitely Windows and Linux AFAIK) doesn't allow mixing of 64-bit and 32-bit code within a process. For example, if your software needs to access specialty hardware, it's not uncommon for ...



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