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26

The agile manifesto simply states: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan No mention of unit tests there. Even the 12 principles do not mention testing. So, technically, it's possible to be an ...


24

To be pedantic, nothing in the Agile Manifesto or the Scrum Guide make any reference to technical practices, like unit testing or TDD, at all. So, yes, in theory you could deliver early and often with a focus on collaboration and value without them and call yourself Agile, you might even actually have agility. In practice however, it's nearly impossible to ...


9

I don't know if there's an officially Scrummy was of handling that, but what I've done in previous teams is the following: Set some time aside Production issues are a reality whether or not we want to admit it. As such, the only sane thing to do is factor them in your planning. When planning your sprints, reserve a percentage of developer effort for ...


7

Even though that there's no direct word stating about unit testing or TDD or any kind of test in the agile manifesto as others have answered here, I believe that a good Scrum Master or Developer would be able to discern one of the statements in the manifesto. Working software over comprehensive documentation. How would anyone know if the software is ...


5

So, how officially are issues of dependencies between stories and inherently serial stories handled by the methodology? As with anything else in Agile: Individuals and interactions over processes and tools If your process isn't serving you, then you mold it into something useful. For this, I would pull in lower priority stories (or some technical debt/...


3

One of the features of kanban, which I believe bleeds over into scrum, is that the process as a whole optimizes for the team, not the individual. In other words, it's no sin if someone on the team is idle for part of the sprint. If the team as a whole chooses X story points, it really doesn't matter (to the stakeholders) whether one person did all the work ...


2

It absolutely makes sense. Agile is not about testing, as others have mentioned already, but to specifically answer your question: No, you do not need unit testing at all. You can run an agile process with integration testing only. You could run an automated integration test nightly for example and fix bugs that are found the next day. You could have a ...


2

Sharing a common core I think it's reasonable to have a common set of core items on your definition of done, but it needs to be flexible. These common items should be clearly obvious and necessary for every team, to the point where there simply is no argument that they should be included. For example, every team should probably have "has unit tests that ...


1

The goal of scrum is to enable the team to be self-directed. There is no universal right way to write stories and tasks. The goal is for the team to work together to accomplish a task. When you write a story and it becomes part of the sprint, your team needs to work together to make that story happen. The first step is a planning session where you break ...


1

Each Teams have negotiated their own DoD. There are some differences between each DoDs. Consistency has it's place, but until you identify the problems a lack of it causes, it's difficult to come up with a solution. The benefit of Scrum/Agile is to let teams manage themselves. If a team can't come to a consensus on an issue, it's good to have some ...


1

Insisting on imposing a fixed process on teams defeats the idea of working in an agile way. Each team should be free to organise itself in a way that allows it to work best. If that means each team has its own definition of done, then that should be accepted as the best solution. If, over time, the teams talk to each other and settle on a single definition, ...


1

No, you can't get the telephone number but you can get other information such as location, birthdate ecc... IF the users explicitly gives you the permission. Those are links to the documentation useful for the purpose: graph api, retrive user's profile and a list of infos you can get


1

It's not required. Testing is great when you have people that really know how to use it. When you don't, not only is it not necessary, it becomes a liability. I'd say there are many programmers who are not very skilled at it. I'm glad you acknowledged in your question that being agile is about how you actually release software instead of following some ...



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