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This is largely due to the security model. On Android, each application runs in its own silo. This is completely different to a desktop OS, where all applications have full access to all the user's data. If we have two applications, A and B, that both use a shared library. If they used the same copy, then potentially application A could break into ...


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You can also deliver the app from a website. Either just use the files on the website like a typical web app or you can create a manifest file and the browser will cache the files to the local system and will automatically check if the files need to be refreshed. http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/467724/HTML-Offline-Capabilities-Using-the-Cache-Manifes


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Solving this problem is one of those situations where using a data abstraction layer (DAL) in your webservice might help you. In your DAL on the server component, realising that there is a performance issue, you could replace the DAL code which writes directly to the database with one that implements a write cache. That should allow the system to handle ...


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Android does have a facility for sharing libraries, but it is a little cumbersome to use so seems to be rarely used in practice. Applications that use Google Play Services, for instance, use this model. The support library, however, specifically does not use this facility because it is expected that applications may be closely tied to a specific version of ...


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Yes Its possible to achieve this in a Cordova app. I had similar requirements and did in a project. localStorage features of HTML5 can be used to store data in offline mode and once a device has detected internet connection then it can automatically send via a service call. So features you need would be: localStorage - for offline storage Cordova ...



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