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There are a few things you should ask for: Source code (obviously). This should include any unit tests and integration tests. Complete documentation on the build process, all the way through to delivery of the binaries to the app stores. This should be demonstrated and possibly video'd Any and all keys or accounts necessary to upload the code to the ...


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I read quite a few forum topics and mailing list (link), the general answer was that if you are using the Android SDK, and you do not have an MP3 encoder/decoder in your application, then you don't need a license for your app. The MP3 license for playing is already provided by the device manufacturer. Also, basically everywhere else than the USA, MP3 ...


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Republish the app with the proper name. There could be legal issues if any of the nodes in the package name are trademarked. Most companies trademark their name, for instance. If they do not prosecute any and all infractions on their trademark, they can lose it (in the US at least). Specifically related to health.com, there are additional terms to ...


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The operative word here is should. This naming convention is by no means mandatory. And it also has nothing to do with being able to see who created the library. The point is that there is a single flat namespace for packages, and that thus every package ever written, including old packages that are no longer maintained, packages that are currently being ...


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C# and Java are very similar languages syntaticaly. But what you are really comparing here is the ease of programming for the frameworks you have to use to make apps for these platforms. Ie WPF and the android app framework. In my view WPF and the other various microsoft frameworks have a maturity and 'solidness' which exceeds comparible offerings. You ...


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It's not HTML but XML you are referring to. Android will create UIs for you if you define them in XML, which is much easier than doing it "by hand", (you have to hardwire and correctly initialise everything). You might need to go the "manual way" (code) if you have to dynamically create such UI from scratch, which is not usual for beginners (although even ...


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You are leaving the radios turned on practically the whole time and this will undoubtedly use up battery. I do see your motivation, however. A decent compromise is to assume that the app is online unless it turns out not to be. If it turns out not to be, and it would like to be, then poll for a connection at long intervals, lengthening as time goes on. 1 ...


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Using a background service won't really help you. The problem is that after a succesful check for wi-fi and server you can't be sure that they are still online while you make your call to get the online data because they may went immediately offline after the succesful check. A better alternative would be to just try to get the live data and if this fails ...


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As the co-founder of Codename One which does pretty much that I can answer that pretty easily. You can cross compile (which is what we do) but you can't have a single binary that will work everywhere because mobile OS vendors don't allow it. Apple doesn't allow JIT's and limits interpreters. All mobile devices include app isolation which prevents a global ...


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It's hard to answer this with the information provided. For instance, you say that you're "stringifying" the data, but you aren't saying what method you're using. Is there a library you're using? Is the string JSON, XML, or some other structured data? I'll assume that you're using some type of structured data (for simplicity, let's say JSON using GSON or ...



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