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4

It is better to go with the first option. Having your 3 clients - mobile, desktop and webapp - use the API in the same way is a better design since all of them use the API in a consistent manner, and any changes in the API will be reflected as-is in all the three clients. This way it is easier to debug and simpler to extend new features. If your Rails app ...


3

I use MVC in both. Yes the views server-side are very simple, but that's ok. Still nice to have separation of concerns for all the usual reasons.


2

In the context of an SGML language where DOM is typically used (i.e. HTML, XML), a node is the smallest piece of text that has semantic meaning. Nodes are arranged in a tree structure, with the document as the root node. Each node can have zero or more children. There are several types of nodes: Document: this is the root node of the whole document. It ...


2

You can introduce an expiry column for your pins. Once you query the pin table to see if your pin is valid (and not expired), you update that expiry date to current time. If your API call succeeds, No further action is required and you have a record of what has happened (you have only done one db write). If the API call fails, you need to go set the expiry ...


2

Etymologically, a "node" is a "knot": think of a fisherman's net as "holes tied together with string", and then nodes are where the string is knotted. The term comes from graph theory in mathematics. If you think of a graph as a collection of points connected to each other by lines ("arcs"), then the points are called nodes. A tree is a special case of a ...


1

It sounds like the big concern of your manager is to make sure the software is always in a working state in the repository. This is not an unreasonable request, as they could pull and compile it for release at any point, and they would want to be confident they are not releasing a bad build. Your manager proposed one option, but this option has the problems ...


1

You can safely compare it to a map of a subway system, e.g. the London Underground: (http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mappa_della_metropolitana_di_Londra) A node is a stop, an edge is the connection between stations. That's about it with general graphs. However, there are special graphs with more, interesting properties, like Trees: ...



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