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58

Being 3.9 times faster than python, the language that consistently loses most benchmarks by considerable margin (ok, it's on par with Perl, Ruby and PHP; but it loses to anything statically typed), is nothing one should be boasting about. The benchmarks game shows C++ programs that are more than order of magnitude faster than python programs in most cases. ...


32

In 1985 Larry Tesler developed a Pascal flavour for Apple, Object Pascal, that became the standard language for System 6. It was based on Clascal, a 1983 Pascal variant for the Lisa, also developed at Apple. Object Pascal was used in MacApp, Apple's primary application framework at the time. MacApp 3.0, released in 1991, was re-written in C++ and Apple ...


20

You need not abandon Java as yet. From an Apple press release dated November 12, 2010 titled Oracle and Apple Announce OpenJDK Project for Mac OS X: Apple also confirmed that Java SE 6 will continue to be available from Apple for Mac OS X Snow LeopardĀ® and the upcoming release of Mac OS X Lion. Java SE 7 and future versions of Java for Mac ...


19

A few things to ask/document (may or may not be what you're looking for): What 3rd party libraries/tools/etc are used? How do you build it? Anything special required for a build? What are the valid targets for the build (OS, version, etc)? (from World Engineer's comment) Where is the source located? How is change managed (releases, branches, etc)? ...


18

First, (IMO) comparing with Python is nearly meaningless. Only comparison with Objective-C is meaningful. How can a new programming language be so much faster? Objective-C is a slow language. (Only C part is fast, but that's because it's C) It has never been extremely fast. It was just fast enough for their (Apple's) purpose, and faster then their older ...


15

You could offer to fill out the application for them, using their information. That removes the obviously bogus 'difficult, tedious' argument. If they still refuse, tell them that you won't work with or for them if you can't trust them, and ask them for an honest explanation.


14

Well Mac OS 10.6.x has a POSIX compatible core, so look for the terminal icon and fire up your UNIX certified terminal! You'll quickly find yourself at home there.


12

Having two computers gives you opportunity to run two operating systems without hassle of virtualization (in my case it's Ubuntu and Win7). And even with both running same OS, you can for example run applications consuming lot of resources, without affecting more interactive stuff running on another machine. Another advantage is ability to use multiple ...


12

Nah, I wouldn't worry about it. First off, Apple's two main compiler toolchains (gcc and clang) both continue to support it. In fact, the main page for clang repeatedly indicates support for Objective C++ is a "goal of the Clang project". Second, unlike MSDN, Apple frequently changes their online technical documentation, and links to articles on their ...


11

Swift is proprietary to Apple and likely will remain so. Given that it uses the Objective-C runtime and is locked into the Cocoa framework, this makes porting a little trickier than it might be otherwise. You could theoretically do something with GNUStep or the like but I'd not hold my breath. On the other hand, the LLVM compilation could make things easier. ...


10

The Apple ][ was generally programmed in either BASIC or 6502 machine code. The Lisa was generally programmed in Pascal. Early Macintosh apps were written in Pascal, first on the Lisa and later on the Mac itself. Think Pascal was the most popular development environment for a time and then Think C. Think C had lightweight objects, sometimes referred to as ...


9

In my opinion working on two machines simultaneously is more hassle than it's worth. It makes sense only when you need two different operating systems, which is not the case here. Otherwise, it just brings additional overhead of managing both machines, synchronizing data between them, and asking questions like this. I would suggest you to sell the older ...


8

One of Apple's criteria for accepting a program is whether or not it makes calls to unsupported Apple API's (or other bad stuff). By requiring static linking, they can prove that the software does not make such calls. Allowing dynamic linking would allow any kind of behavior to be added later, which pretty much invalidates their approval process. Apple ...


7

Ok, there will be a whole raft of factors that might contribute to this - not just the keyboard. Things to consider include Your height relative to the desk Your position relative to the desk Your position relative to the keyboard (how close/far away you are) Where your hands/wrists/forearms rest when using the keyboard Where your monitor is - as this ...


7

It depends on where you want to go: C#: will have the shortest learning curve if you already know java, but M$ dependent like you said. If you want to do anything with windows, C# is a great choice. C++: not worth it IMHO as its more difficult to use. Inherent lower-level makes it better for game programming. VB.NET: I agree with you, if you want a CLI ...


7

I made the same switch this year. I've been a web developer since 1998, and last April got hired by a company that basically did the same thing--sold some iPhone projects and then figured out how to deliver them. It was a solid month before I wrote ANYTHING that ended up in production code. That month was one of the most intense periods of learning I've ...


7

Application stores, which force the user to go through them (as this happens on iPhone), dramatically change the business scene for software vendors. With "old-style" approach the user needed to go to the search engine to find an application he needs or to rely on friends' suggestions or magazine articles. This made it possible for developers to create a ...


7

The University of Washington's Extension Program has a 3-class, 9-month certification curriculum in iOS and Mac Application Development. I think the coursework is in-class only, but there might be an online option as well. UW is a very well respected university.


7

The standard language of Mac OS Classic was Pascal. The OS's API documentation was all written for Pascal, and as much of the OS as was not written in hand-optimized ASM was written in Pascal. After transitioning to the PowerPC architecture, they rewrote the OS in C++, accompanied by a very noticeable decrease in system stability, which will not be ...


7

There is an official support page on the subject: Changes To Embedding Python Using Xcode 5.0 According to that page the rationale is: Because Python is a framework, it also resides in the SDK, even though Python (or any scripting language) has difficulties being in two places. Due to both long-term and recent issues, it was decided to remove Python ...


6

If you want to know what's on the App Store, look at the App Store. I don't think you are going to produce good work if you start by asking yourself, "What should I not do?" Come up with a few ideas for apps, then search the App Store for them. If you find a dozen apps already there, you can avoid that category. (Unless you think you can do something much ...


6

Apple used to specifically advertise that it was an excellent platform for scientific development, because they supported all major language platforms. Compared to Apple's current main business - mp3 players, cell phones and associated toy apps - the potential extra income from offering a scientific development platform is negligible. Money talks. ...


6

First, I would thank the employer for getting me such nice gear. Courtesy is sadly lacking in today's workplace. Next, I would look at what it is that I need to do for the employer, and if it REQUIRED Linux (i.e., direct dependence on a particular set of binaries in a distribution) I would set up a virtual environment to host it (I am partial to VMWare - to ...


6

A big problem with trying to be tricky is you never know when/if someone who purchased your app will run it again. I am assuming you don't have some sort of registration involved with your app where you have contact information of your users, that would be too easy. Probably the best way: Introduce a new version that is free and keep the paid version. ...


6

Don't worry too much about registering under your dad's name. iTunes Connect allows you to choose a "company name" to list your software under, which can basically be anything you choose. Your dad's name will be listed in iTunes Connect, but your customers won't see it. See the iTunes Connect user's guide for more information. The only concern is it may be ...


6

Apple has this scenario covered. Your client will need to join the iOS dev program so they can post things to the store. They can then add you to their program for development certificates and such if you don't have your own as well as provision an iTunes connect account for you to publish to the store on their behalf. I would advise getting your own iOS ...


6

Don't know what you app is, but have you considered/would a data driven model work for you - the app would not need to change and the data can be downloaded of servers you provide and manage. Maybe a (yet another) DSL would be of use. Another alternate is how locked into Apple are you? Build you business on Android - then you have the choice to use a ...


6

Yes, there are bots that auto down applications in order to boost rankings of applications: View Article Here Your downloads were most likely used as a way to mask the fact they are downloading specific apps to boost rankings. So 20 bots download Angry Birds (for example), 2 of those also download yours and some others to make it look like normal usage. ...


6

Swift is currently proprietary, but there are rumors it is going to be released as an open source project. I wouldn't hold my breath on this, though. Apple does release the entire grammar in the back of the language reference manual so it's hopeful that they may be intending to release it.



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