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67

Being 3.9 times faster than python, the language that consistently loses most benchmarks by considerable margin (ok, it's on par with Perl, Ruby and PHP; but it loses to anything statically typed), is nothing one should be boasting about. The benchmarks game shows C++ programs that are more than order of magnitude faster than python programs in most cases. ...


52

First, (IMO) comparing with Python is nearly meaningless. Only comparison with Objective-C is meaningful. How can a new programming language be so much faster? Objective-C is a slow language. (Only C part is fast, but that's because it's C) It has never been extremely fast. It was just fast enough for their (Apple's) purpose, and faster then their older ...


32

In 1985 Larry Tesler developed a Pascal flavour for Apple, Object Pascal, that became the standard language for System 6. It was based on Clascal, a 1983 Pascal variant for the Lisa, also developed at Apple. Object Pascal was used in MacApp, Apple's primary application framework at the time. MacApp 3.0, released in 1991, was re-written in C++ and Apple ...


17

Nah, I wouldn't worry about it. First off, Apple's two main compiler toolchains (gcc and clang) both continue to support it. In fact, the main page for clang repeatedly indicates support for Objective C++ is a "goal of the Clang project". Second, unlike MSDN, Apple frequently changes their online technical documentation, and links to articles on their ...


16

One of Apple's criteria for accepting a program is whether or not it makes calls to unsupported Apple API's (or other bad stuff). By requiring static linking, they can prove that the software does not make such calls. Allowing dynamic linking would allow any kind of behavior to be added later, which pretty much invalidates their approval process. Apple ...


15

You could offer to fill out the application for them, using their information. That removes the obviously bogus 'difficult, tedious' argument. If they still refuse, tell them that you won't work with or for them if you can't trust them, and ask them for an honest explanation.


11

The Apple ][ was generally programmed in either BASIC or 6502 machine code. The Lisa was generally programmed in Pascal. Early Macintosh apps were written in Pascal, first on the Lisa and later on the Mac itself. Think Pascal was the most popular development environment for a time and then Think C. Think C had lightweight objects, sometimes referred to as ...


7

Application stores, which force the user to go through them (as this happens on iPhone), dramatically change the business scene for software vendors. With "old-style" approach the user needed to go to the search engine to find an application he needs or to rely on friends' suggestions or magazine articles. This made it possible for developers to create a ...


7

I made the same switch this year. I've been a web developer since 1998, and last April got hired by a company that basically did the same thing--sold some iPhone projects and then figured out how to deliver them. It was a solid month before I wrote ANYTHING that ended up in production code. That month was one of the most intense periods of learning I've ...


7

If you want to know what's on the App Store, look at the App Store. I don't think you are going to produce good work if you start by asking yourself, "What should I not do?" Come up with a few ideas for apps, then search the App Store for them. If you find a dozen apps already there, you can avoid that category. (Unless you think you can do something much ...


7

The standard language of Mac OS Classic was Pascal. The OS's API documentation was all written for Pascal, and as much of the OS as was not written in hand-optimized ASM was written in Pascal. After transitioning to the PowerPC architecture, they rewrote the OS in C++, accompanied by a very noticeable decrease in system stability, which will not be ...


7

There is an official support page on the subject: Changes To Embedding Python Using Xcode 5.0 According to that page the rationale is: Because Python is a framework, it also resides in the SDK, even though Python (or any scripting language) has difficulties being in two places. Due to both long-term and recent issues, it was decided to remove Python ...


7

The reason is security as mentioned in this Stack Overflow question: The reason is security: since a dynamic library can be loaded and unloaded at runtime you could download additional executable code and load it (think plug-in). This could get compromised by a hacker and then having malicious code executing on your phone is a very bad thing. It ...


6

The simplest way is to get two user accounts on the Macbook and switch between user sessions whenever you want to switch between work project and hobby project.


6

A big problem with trying to be tricky is you never know when/if someone who purchased your app will run it again. I am assuming you don't have some sort of registration involved with your app where you have contact information of your users, that would be too easy. Probably the best way: Introduce a new version that is free and keep the paid version. ...


6

Apple has this scenario covered. Your client will need to join the iOS dev program so they can post things to the store. They can then add you to their program for development certificates and such if you don't have your own as well as provision an iTunes connect account for you to publish to the store on their behalf. I would advise getting your own iOS ...


6

Don't know what you app is, but have you considered/would a data driven model work for you - the app would not need to change and the data can be downloaded of servers you provide and manage. Maybe a (yet another) DSL would be of use. Another alternate is how locked into Apple are you? Build you business on Android - then you have the choice to use a ...


6

Yes, there are bots that auto down applications in order to boost rankings of applications: View Article Here Your downloads were most likely used as a way to mask the fact they are downloading specific apps to boost rankings. So 20 bots download Angry Birds (for example), 2 of those also download yours and some others to make it look like normal usage. ...


6

There are three different types of account: The individual developer account. You can push test builds to specific devices you register with Apple. You can push to 100 or 200 (I forget which) unique devices per year. Test builds expire after three months. TestFlight is very helpful for managing the process. When you are done testing the application, ...


5

There are three options: If it's more than 100 devices, get the client to sign up to an Apple Enterprise account then they can deploy the app via an ad-hoc build to all their employee's devices without needing to individually add each device UDID to the provisioning profile. (If it's less than 100 devices they can just get a regular developer account, but ...


5

In theory it should be fine. The BSD license is a Permissive free software license which means it doesn't insist on anything using it being shared in the same way. The BSD license only says that redistribution and use in source and binary forms are permitted (subject to certain constraints) but doesn't mandate how that should be other than that the ...


5

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BSD_licenses You have several versions of the BSD license. It's one of the simplest licenses, so you should simply read it. Here is the "longest one": Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: Redistributions of ...


5

The courts should never have allowed Apple to sue using that patent, but the simple solution is not to do overscroll anywhere but on iOS. Be creative. Come up with a different way elsewhere. Overscroll isn't the only way of showing that a user has reached the end. On Android 4.0+, they create a glow at the bottom (or top) that grows as the user continues ...


5

Apple's sample code is just that, sample code. No guarantee that it works, that it is bug free, that it is the best way to achieve something. Use it to study some area that you don't know much about, until you are knowledgable in that area by yourself. And then throw the sample code away. Which is what you should do with any code that you find on the ...


4

I am not a lawyer, etc. Take a look at IOS Standard Agreement 3.3.9 which says collection of "user or device data" must be consented to. I think that it's cool to collect data relating to your own application's behavior. For instance, I track what are essentially "page hits" within my travel app to try to judge popularity (I do disclose it, because I don't ...


4

I know zero about the Apple Developer agreement, but you should tell your users if you're using their bandwidth. If you phone home without telling them, they're going to be a lot more paranoid than if you did tell them. Be upfront and let them know exactly what you're doing.


4

This depends on who owns the application. If the application, copyright and IP are under the ownership of the client, then it should be done under their licence, you can not be responsible for the application once your term with the client is complete. However, if you retain ownership of the application, then you should be held responsible for the ...


4

Thanks for the reply Kevin - I took your advice. Answer: The company that wishes to distribute the app in-house would be required to purchase the enterprise account and then grant the developer access.



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