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62

Be proactive and contact the company who runs the service you are using, and ask them if they are ok with your app being available on the app store, and with the way it uses their services. This approach has benefits: If you ignore the email from this competing company, they might inform the service owners of your app, which might lead them to ask you to ...


32

Ideas are cheap. It's implementation that really matters. If he's not commissioning you to create the app for him and paying you what your time is worth, I would give him a very meager cut of the profits. Certainly less than 50%.


18

How do I decide what percentage is realistic? No %. At best he gets a free copy. (Also, You post it on the App store.. NOT him) EDIT IT'S NOT STEALING! The Customer has NO interest in this Business, he is just trying to get free work. This is one of the oldest Scams in the book. You know what i used to tell My customers who suggested ...


16

Are you willing to take the risk that if you work for free/almost-free, and the product does not sell, you will make nothing? Do you have enough saved to pay the bills if this happens? Is the idea so amazingly revolutionary that you will make a small fortune on it? ...Avoid this if you can. The customer should pay as much as they can, but never nothing. ...


15

The people you want to contact are the Software Freedom Law Center, who may initiate a dialog with Apple for you. While contacting the FSF directly might get you a sympathetic ear and a list of people you could contact for help, there is little they can do as they don't own the copyright to your software. You should contact them to report a GPL violation ...


15

You could offer to fill out the application for them, using their information. That removes the obviously bogus 'difficult, tedious' argument. If they still refuse, tell them that you won't work with or for them if you can't trust them, and ask them for an honest explanation.


13

I think that you can only lose by choosing not to communicate. If you don't plan to implement the feature now, at least suggest users that it is not in the current plan to implement, but might be considered in the future. This would not let users think that it's a feature they can expect soon and will send a message that you are not planning on it either. ...


12

As others have pointed out, every application and developer is a different story, just as they are for desktop software products. You can develop an approximate feel for a marketplace, but how your particular application will sell depends entirely on what it does, its price, the overall user experience, whether or not you are promoted by the platform ...


12

This developer has posted the iOS version stats his app sees (updated weekly). Currently (as of August 13, 2012) about 73% of devices use IOS 5.X. Update for iOS 6: Here some newer stats on iOS 6 Adoption two weeks after its release.


11

You must get the opinion of a lawyer. They could be just trying to stomp you out without any real legal case.


10

Before you start getting a bunch of lawyers involved, you really ought to contact the company doing the publishing. It's possible that this is an act of ignorance and not malice on their part, and if you were to talk with them you could resolve things. Among the various things that could happen is them purchasing a commercial license to your code from you, ...


9

I would say release as soon as it is ready - unless it is Christmas week, or you app is truly seasonal (like a reindeer app). By delaying you may be overtaken by events (or other apps); and the mantra of release early, release often is pretty accurate.


9

Put together a stock "thank you for your interest" letter that covers the possibilities of a) features you will NEVER implement even if I show up on your doorstep with a bag of gold, b) features you don't PLAN to implement but maybe, and c) features you'd like to implement but can't right now. Send that. Because you ALMOST never know when you might find ...


8

Some have actually earned over $1M, and posted such on their blogs, but read further. Look at the iPhone App store app categories sorted by "top revenue". You will see several free apps supported only by in-app revenue among the top 200. Apple has paid out well over a billion (USD) to developers, with a healthy portion going to those the top revenue app ...


8

Do it like a record contract. He gets 90% of the profit, but first you get to recoup the development costs. Simple.


8

Do you agree with the assessment in the letter? Are you infringing on the usage policy? If so, you should stop. This isn't a matter of "keep going until you get caught by the right person". If you're infringing, stop.


7

If you own 100% of the code in your application, (like in the iRail example you linked to) then you can dual-license the code: one for AppStore and one for everybody else. If you don't own 100% of the (i.e. you make use of GPL third-party libraries) then you also need to get permission of those copyright-holders, and you need to get a new license from them ...


7

There is no official story from Oracle as to why they closed the store. From the Distimo Blog article "Java App Store discontinued by Sun/Oracle?": We have been unable to uncover any official announcement on the matter. All that is left is speculation (1, 2); perhaps Oracle didn't want to deal with the malware potential and PR nightmare, perhaps ...


7

To me, the table on the website you mentioned has a somewhat-naïve representation of these differences. It seems to focus on pushing a native app as the best possible solution because of "browsing speed" and access to device functionality, but this may not always be what you actually want to achieve. They haven't taken into consideration other factors which ...


7

Ideally, you should use such requests as an opportunity to help you and users better understand the application. If you think of it, the very reasons why you prefer to ignore these requests are quite important information and you'd rather have them stored and documented than buried and forgotten deep down in your mind. If a request is ignored because you ...


6

When you submit a binary to App Store, you can give instructions to Apple about how to test the application. There you can provide them with test credentials. In the iTunes Connect Developper Guide, in the section "Supply Version Information", the field "Review Notes" is described as such : Use this field to give demo account information with full ...


6

Don't worry too much about registering under your dad's name. iTunes Connect allows you to choose a "company name" to list your software under, which can basically be anything you choose. Your dad's name will be listed in iTunes Connect, but your customers won't see it. See the iTunes Connect user's guide for more information. The only concern is it may be ...


6

This guy from several android app, only from ads earns ~1300-~1700$ each month. You can read his income reports here.


6

If your working on a big update but don't want to give the impression of inactivity, write a blog post about it so that your customers can see that you haven't been hit by a bus. Other than that, I push fixes/updates as soon as they are available and tested. Severe emphasis on the and tested part. Lots of people out there have the one-line-fix mentality ...


6

Apple has this scenario covered. Your client will need to join the iOS dev program so they can post things to the store. They can then add you to their program for development certificates and such if you don't have your own as well as provision an iTunes connect account for you to publish to the store on their behalf. I would advise getting your own iOS ...


6

Don't know what you app is, but have you considered/would a data driven model work for you - the app would not need to change and the data can be downloaded of servers you provide and manage. Maybe a (yet another) DSL would be of use. Another alternate is how locked into Apple are you? Build you business on Android - then you have the choice to use a ...


6

Yes, there are bots that auto down applications in order to boost rankings of applications: View Article Here Your downloads were most likely used as a way to mask the fact they are downloading specific apps to boost rankings. So 20 bots download Angry Birds (for example), 2 of those also download yours and some others to make it look like normal usage. ...


5

Publish a free with ads and paid version of your app I've got five different apps on the Android marketplace right now between what I've developed for my startup and what I've developed independently. I'm working on breaking into the Windows Phone 7 Marketplace where another person I work with already has two apps in there. The story is the same in both ...


5

There's no way to do that at the moment unfortunately. I would suggest you add some sort of optional registration on the iPhone app, and offer the Mac app for free to those customers through a download outside the Mac App Store.


5

As a native English speaker, I would say that yes poorly written descriptions turn me off a little. That said, if I heard of it word-of-mouth I'm probably just going to install it without reading the description. At the price-point of most applications I would expect less polish, and the indie aspect of games is one of the greatest things about the App ...



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