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The simple answer is thats the order the binary instructions on most processors are laid out. Back when men were men and sheep were scared assembly programers spent a lot of time looking at raw binary code (and sometimes trying to infer what instruction was hanging from the on/off lights in the control panel). It was just easier if the assembly code ...


2

I do not know what the deal is with sigils, other than perhaps to scare the uninitiated and to annoy those wise enough to know that they could have very easily been missing. Hopefully, another answerer will have more insight on this. (As ratchet freak mentioned in the comments, it was probably done this way in order to simplify the parser, which perhaps ...


3

Lets start out by making a distinction between assembly and machine code. These are often seen as something very similar, and they are, but there's a step between the assembly language and the machine language - that of the assembler. People don't work in machine code anymore (they did long ago) its too much of a pain. Working with an assembler gives you ...


2

Ok if nobody else wants to, I'll have a hack at it, assuming avx2 available (untested because avx2 isn't for me). No idea if this is actually faster than just plowing through 8 iterations of bsf on a 64 bit integer register. I have my doubts. Assume src_address holds the most significant bit. src_address + 511 holds the least. bsf finds the least ...



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