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227

I've written the same app on GAE (Python and now Java) and Azure. I'll probably continue to use both, for different things. Here are a few thoughts that I'll keep updating: Reasons to use GAE: You essentially get one free VM's worth of use per day. With Azure, you pay almost $100 each month, even if you don't have a single website visitor. If your db goes ...


176

I'm clearly biased - I work on the App Engine team doing developer relations - but this is my take: They're not directly comparable. There's a set of apps you could write for any of them, but you'll be writing a different thing in each case. App Engine provides a restricted runtime environment - no writing to files, no sockets, and so forth - and a ...


28

Yes, pretty much. With the "cloud" (as in "cloud providers"), you are renting the diskspace, bandwidth, CPU and memory owned by the provider and the means to use them from your software. They give you the infrastructure and you don't own the hardware. There are other forms of cloud computing that don't involve these providers, where you (the organisation) ...


10

Personally I don't like being dependent on external services when it isn't absolutely necessary. As you say, if one day the EULA changes, APIs change, anonymous hacks twitter or twitter stops its services entirely, then you'll have to deal with it. It could essentially boil down to higher costs in support and in maintenance one day. Also, it's not easily ...


9

Sounds almost like a PHB's idea from Dilbert comics. The more I think about it, the funnier it gets. In short: No, unless you want to become laughing stock. It won't work anyway, Twitter has strict anti-spam limits, it's meant for status updates from human and no one is likely to post 1000+ status updates per day :).


9

Is unanswerable, except to say it depends. There are a lot of factors which will determine which approach is going to be the best in your case, e.g.: Is it normal for created objects to be retrieved shortly after they are created? What's the ratio of updates to accesses? Re. deciding you need a cache: If you're optimising without data then yes, it's ...


8

Cloud computing says absolutely nothing about who owns the resources. Cloud computing is an architecture for developing distributed, network-based applications. There are a number of cloud computing service providers out there, such as Azure Services Platform, Amazon Web Services, Google App Engine, and a number of others. However, using someone else's ...


7

It contains a packaged version of your project. I found a blog entry mentioning it. Before an Azure package can be deployed to the emulator it must first be packaged. Since v1.4 of the Windows Azure Tools, the csx folder and its contents are no longer generated during compilation... So in order to force the generation of the csx folder we need to specify ...


5

Use an external log server. Twitter is neither secure, nor reliable. You shouldn't post the logs on a publicly readable medium, since you never know if it contains sensible data or not.


5

No. Watch the Twitter engineering talks they openly admit that they can accept some failure in some case loss of messages and no-notifications without incident. Also I would be concerned about the account being auto-blocked for what looks like abuse (breaking a certain rate-limit trigger etc..) Not a good idea, Although what you could do, is after you ...


5

It's been my experience that nearly all "training programs" are usually wastes of money. I would at the least be cautious about spending a lot of money for any kind of training program.


5

Some things to consider: Getting up to speed: how quickly can you get productive with the chosen environment what kind of docs exist and are they clear and well supported samples apparent and useful Cost: cost is a factor, but if you are making a commercial App that will actually have customers, these are all viable choices. If you assume that Azure, with ...


5

I would go with Option 2.. You most certainly don't need a dedicated SQL Server machine for each client, you don't even need and dedicated Instance. I don't know you think that is the case. My primary reason for this is that when the time comes that you want to scale horizontally (more servers) this is going to best position you to do that. I don't ...


4

If you need to start instances manually to meet the demand then it's not a cloud. Azure and EC2 are just virtual servers with some services on the side. Update: EC2 and Azure do give you options to manage starting new instances automatically under load, but you still have to manage this. And you pay for instances that are up and idle. GAE handles this ...


4

Here is a corroborating article on CultOfMac.com: http://www.cultofmac.com/icloud-is-built-on-the-backs-of-windows-azure-and-amazon/100594 It looks like they are both citing InfiniteApple.net as a source.


4

No. Cloud computing is not merely a way to rent resources. Cloud is all about services that: are delivered over the network (possibly the Internet) are fully controlled by API are fully automatable and automated require no human interaction for control are delivered as a commodity are billed like a utility: for measured usage require no capital ...


3

The big difference you are going to find between the platforms is how the vendor abstracted the environment. It will determine how you are going to develop your application or services. You can think of that as the API (of sorts for the application). The servies that you use within each vendor's context is up to you. AWS doesn't really abstract much at the ...


3

I would not be in favour of this either. I don't see why you'd want to do it either. It might be worth asking him who actually uses twitter for automated logging - I haven't come across it myself and as far as twitter is used as an update for service issues for some suppliers, it is run by a human in the company's service desk for the purposes of ...


3

Maybe I'm overly skeptical, but why not just do Microsoft's own program? To me there are a few things that just don't seem right. For example: After having purchased a license to the program you can immediately start studying the modules available. When you have performed all of the required laborations you can take the program’s test to get a diploma ...


3

No. Use syslogd hosted via any cheap ISP or on your own BSD server exposed to the internet via your corporate firewall. man logd: NAME syslogd -- log systems messages SYNOPSIS syslogd [-468ACcdknosuv] [-a allowed_peer] [-b bind_address] [-f config_file] [-l [mode:]path] [-m mark_interval] [-P pid_file] [-p log_socket] DESCRIPTION The ...


3

Hmmm, I think this is for what Loggly was created. Loggly is a cloud logging system based on Apache Solr technology. As they say, it can handle millions of events per second. Seeing your needs, this solution can fit. In addition, they exposes a search API using a sort of custom query language.


3

It depends on a lot of things (It'd be pretty hard to compare the two, but I'm sure someone who has enough time could find the real answer). However, all things being equal as far as total throughput of the two separate VS the combined, the extra instance option will give you some nice benefits: Theoretically, it gives you a higher chance that your ...



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