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BDD adds one more level of abstraction to the tests. The higher level code (usually in txt) describes what the system tests, the lower level code describes how it tests it. So a BDD framework can use a TDD framework in the lower level code. This helps a lot by staying DRY. By TDD you can easily end up with "wet" tests containing a lot of code duplication, ...


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Dan North and others did refer to it as Behaviour-Driven Design back in the early days, when JBehave was just a replacement for JUnit. However, when it moved up the stack to the system level, with examples that described the behaviour of entire applications rather than just individual classes, it became apparent that it affected more than just the design, ...


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Generally speaking, a software project is a collection of code, data and tests. Typically these should all live in the same repository. Using BDD or TDD means simply to check in (or at least develop) your tests before developing your code. It doesn't have to be any more complicated than that. So, the reason why no specialized workflow has been created is ...


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Honestly, this doesn't sound like something your VCS should care about. Your VCS should only care about the storage of, revisions to and merging of changes to your source code. The idea of a wishlist of features doesn't fit with any of those things. A wishlist of features is the domain of a product backlog (or something similar). Stakeholders can file new ...


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I think you should try Morelia: https://morelia.readthedocs.org/en/latest/ It passes your 4-point requirements list: It's BDD tool built on Python's unittests module Executed tests are textual description. If you can automatically run traditional Unit Tests then Morelia can be run same way. I think the most common CI for github is Travis-CI which can run ...



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