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English (and I presume other languages as well) has a lot of words which can be used in a generic sense, but are no longer correct in a context which requires more distinction. For example, you can use the word "goose" to refer to a goose of any gender or age when speaking in the more common generic sense, but if a distinction must be made, a male goose is ...


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First, let's recap: "parameter = the variable's name" "argument = the expression we pass to the function" Note too that "argument" isn't the variable's name. Therefore, it is everything else. Figuratively speaking, you can think of "argument" as a pipe/line. A line that connects the text in the source code holding the "actual argument" with the text in ...


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The term "argument" is often used rather loosely to refer to either actual arguments or formal arguments without giving the actual or formal adjective. Most often, the context makes it clear if actual arguments or formal arguments/parameters is meant. In this case, it should be clear that the authors meant formal arguments or parameters. As to why they ...


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"Head First" is a series specifically aimed at less technical beginners. It has a less structured, more artsy style to it rather than the very grid-like layout of the other books. "Introducing" books are typically just that, a short introduction to a language or other technology. "Learning" books are usually the first book in a series aiming a ...


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The O'Reilly Python 'Cookbook' is a book full of Python projects from start to finish, not unlike a recipe book for the language. A 'Introducing' book is generally designed for a beginner of the language. It teaches basic syntax and programming principles in general. I could be wrong, but It looks like the 'Head First' books are just older versions of the ...


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A good talk (~45 min) on this topic by Stuart Sierra: http://www.infoq.com/presentations/Clojure-Design-Patterns Not necessarily binding and authoritative, but I recognized a number of his examples from my own experience using FP for data analysis. Examples written in Clojure, but likely applicable to any FP language. The names he gives to the patterns ...



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